Archived Exhibitions

Mars Update

August 31 – December 1, 2013
Saturdays & Sundays at 1:00 p.m.

 

 

Presented in partnership with the JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND
and TED UBELHOR

 

In October 2012 the rover Curiosity touched down on the surface of Mars. This mission follows the wildly successful earlier missions involving the rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Where are these spacecraft now on the Red Planet? Are they still working? What have they discovered so far? In our fall planetarium show, Mars Update,we’ll explain the answer to these questions and share the latest news from Mars!

Our show begins with a 15-minute synopsis of how our views on Mars have changed over the years - from the writings of authors H.G. Wells and Percival Lowell to the NASA robot, Curiosity. We’ll see how a world that was once thought to be full of life and Earth-like was, in reality, a cold, dusty, dry planet.

The show concludes with a presentation detailing where you would find Mars that night, the current status of all the rovers and what they’ve discovered, and other spacecraft updates. 

 


X-Ray Vision : Fish Inside And Out

July 6 – September 29, 2013

 

 

Presented in cooperation with the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES

 

The Evansville Convention and Visitors Bureau Center for History and Science exhibition finds beauty in natural science and features numerous black and white digital prints that illustrate the architecture of fish. These X-rays give a tour through the long stream of fish evolution. Produced by the Smithsonian Institution, the exhibition pairs fish with illustrated labels that explore the scientific, environmental, and photographic relevance of over 30 fish. The X-rays have allowed the Smithsonian and other scientists to study the skeleton of a fish without altering the sampling, making it easier for scientists to build a comprehensive picture of fish diversity.

X-rays are used to record variations in fish skeletons, such as the number of vertebrae or the position of fins. The Smithsonian’s National Collection of Fishes represent more than 70% of the world’s fish specimens and is the largest and most diverse collection of its kind in the world. Although the X-rays featured in the national collection were made for research purposes, the strikingly elegant images demonstrate the natural union of science

and art and are a visual retelling of the evolution of fish.

X-ray Vision: Fish Inside Out, is organized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES). The exhibition is part of a ten-city national tour.

 


 

The Bone Zone: A Carnival of Healthy Choices

March 24 – June 23

 

 

Presented in cooperation with the WELBORN BAPTIST FOUNDATION

 

Enter an exhibit with a carnival theme that will provide an entertaining setting for children of all ages. Museum visitors can learn about the importance of diet and exercise and how to create and keep healthy bones. This exhibition takes place in the Evansville Convention and Visitor Bureau Center for History and Science located in the newly renovated area of the Museum.

The Bone Zone is comprised of numerous displays which feature interactive games, hands-on activities, entertaining videos, and information about bone health, diet, and exercise. Exhibits such as “Your Bones Are Alive”, “The Incredible Bone Crusher” and “The Amazing Bone Builder” explore the importance of a healthy diet and reveals which foods provide your body with the best source of calcium.

Additional activities include a fun house mirror and a simulated X-ray machine. There is also a computer game that tests your ability to make the best food and exercise choices in order to build a healthy skeleton. The centerpiece for the exhibition is “The Hip Joint” which provides a dance floor where you can tap out a tune with your feet.

The exhibit was created by the Purdue Agriculture Exhibit Design Center with support from the Indiana Dairy and Nutrition Council. According to Connie Weaver, head of the Department of Foods and Nutrition at Purdue University, “Our primary goal for The Bone Zone was to stress that food and exercise choices now affect bone health today and in the future. Bones grow fastest between the ages of 9 and 18 so we encourage school groups and families to visit. Poor diets and little exercise can cause broken bones in young people and lead to bone diseases like osteoporosis in the future. By entering this carnival of learning children can examine important health concepts in an entertaining way.

 


 

Skulls & Bones

April 28 - July 7, 2013

 

 

In this April 28 - July 24 exhibition, visitors will have a chance to learn about the rigid skeleton system of humans and many animals. Without a structure to support them, our bodies would be a shapeless mass of muscles, organs, and water. We’ll learn about the complex structure of bones, find out how you can identify a variety of animal skulls, and get tips on the importance of diet and exercise in order to maintain bone health. The exhibition contains displays of animal bones and skulls, plus several hands-on activities.

In one section of the exhibition we use a microscope to magnify the amazing structure of bones. We learn to identify the different internal parts of bones and how bones are actually living tissue which, in addition to being a repository for minerals, is also responsible for the production of life-giving red and white blood cells.

In another section of the exhibition, we see how a researcher at the University of Southern Indiana has created a computer model that calculates the force produced when different species of bats bite down on food or prey. Such calculations provide insight on how skull shape relates to the different diets of bats. The skulls of different types of creatures will be on display, giving visitors an opportunity to compare and contrast the sizes and different eating habits of many different kinds of animals.

The exhibition will also include bones of our extinct, ice age mastodon; and a section depicting 3-D animations of select skulls.

 

 


 

Hubble Vision

Saturdays & Sundays at 1:00 p.m.

January 5 - May 26, 2013

 

 

Keyhole Nebula

 

Presented in partnership with F. BIRK FISCHER

 

For nearly a quarter of a century the Hubble Space Telescope has pointed its unblinking eye at tens of thousands of objects in the Universe. Hubble will bring to life its unparalleled views of planets, galaxies, stars, nebulae, and more.

Because it is equipped with instruments that “see” in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light, the Hubble Space Telescope is able to capture views that were unimaginable to astronomers of generations past. It has made hundreds of thousands of observations, both of faraway objects and of our closest neighbors in space, the planets of our Solar System. With the Hubble Space Telescope, scientists have been able to monitor the weather on Mars, watch as a comet fragmented and bombarded Jupiter’s atmosphere, and peer at galaxies that are at the far edge of space.

Hubble has remained in orbit around Earth capturing views inaccessible to Earth-based instruments since 1990. It has observed the pulsar at the heart of the Crab Nebula, the unstable but beautiful supergiant star Eta Carinae, and eyed a star nursery located within the Great Nebula below Orion’s belt. The Telescope has been able to look at many different sites of star birth and death within our galaxy and outer nearby galaxies capturing breathtaking, sometimes iconic images.

This program will take visitors on a journey through space, highlighting amazing images and exciting new discoveries. Hubble Vision was created by Loch Ness Productions.

 



You Won’t Believe Your Eyes!

December 16, 2012 - March 10, 2013

 

 

Presented in Partnership with 
THE EYE GROUP OF SOUTHERN INDIANA

 

The December 1, 2012 – March 10, 2013 Center for History and Science exhibition, YOU WON’T BELIEVE YOUR EYES!, will incorporate tantalizing, two-dimensional graphics, mindbending interactive software, and several intriguing exhibits that feature some of the world’s best illusions. This display will showcase an incredible array of graphic illusions that will evoke some surprising visual effects. Our collection of over a dozen illusions will feature classic optical effects, as well as some illusions so powerful, so stunning, so mesmerizing, that you won’t believe your eyes!

Included in the exhibition are Impossible Images, twodimensional images that suggest paradoxical threedimensional physical objects and Ambiguous Images, illustrations of figures that have more than one meaningful interpretation. The show also includes images with Relative Motion that are perceived as having motion effects; Geometrical Illusions which incorporate straight lines or circles that appear bent or distorted; and Scintillation Illusions, recently devised illusions which appear to flash before your eyes.

You Won’t Believe Your Eyes includes several hands-on devices that explore a wide-range of perceptual effects. In one area of the exhibition a computer station allows for experimentation using software-based simulations where you will be able to manipulate your own illusions, learn more about the theory behind optical illusions, and view video profiles of distinguished mathematicians and artists involved in the field. The exhibition also includes several small physical illusions and a display of anamorphoses – illusions which use highly polished metal cylinders to reveal hidden images within.

 

 

 

WHAT TO DO:

Look at the intersections and count the dots. Look away and count again. As you move your eyes around the image, the dots will appear to flicker. Stare steadily at any one dot and it will disappear.

WHAT’S GOING ON?

The light from this illusion enters your retina and activates cells in the retina that respond to light. The cells, however, respond better to small spots of light than to large spots. This means that each cell is optimally activated by a tiny spot of light entering at some particular point. These same cells are also inhibited by light falling on the immediately surrounding region.

 


 

 

Light Years from Andromeda

September 1 - December 2, 2012

 

 

Presented in partnership with the 
GRAY CEMETERY TRUST

 

New for the Fall, the Koch Planetarium program LIGHT YEARS FROM ANDROMEDA, considers a beam of light as it speeds across the vast Universe. Over the course of centuries, beings on a far-away planet form cultures and begin to wonder about the Universe surrounding them. As the beam of light draws nearer to their planet, their awareness of the night sky increases. 

Today, the people of Earth study space, which helps them understand the properties of light. We use technology to study the stars and use what we learn to further shape our view of the Universe. Light years, light speed, human development, and our beliefs involving the night sky are some of the topics for our newest feature show in the Koch Planetarium, which is created by Loch Ness Productions.

Presentations of Light Years from Andromeda will be offered each Saturday and Sunday from September 1 – December 2 at 1:00 p.m. Admission is free for Museum Members.

 

 


Outreach to Space

 

 

Presented in partnership with the 
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND

 

Initially made possible by a grant from the National Science Foundation, OUTREACH TO SPACE was designed as a collaborative project among ten U.S. museums and the respected exhibit designers at San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Built to withstand the rigors of family experimentation exhibition teaches adults and children about Space and Space travel through hands-on exploration.

One popular exhibit, Different Worlds, Different Weights, allows guests to compare the weight of an apple on Earth against the weight of an apple on other bodies in the Solar System. Another star attraction is Space Colony, which encourages children to use LEGO® brand blocks and a lot of imagination to construct their own visions for the future of Space exploration. Children and adults alike enjoy experimenting with Pressure Suit, allowing them to pump air out of the exhibit chamber and to observe two “Bug Out Bob” aliens inside, one fitted with a pressurized helmet and one exposed to the dropping pressure. Space suits worn by astronauts serve many important functions, including shielding the body from the vacuum of Space. Without a pressurized suit, the human body would expand to about two times its normal size.

From 2007 - 2010, the Outreach to Space project traveled to 35 fairs, festivals, and community events in the Tri-State area. From county fairs to classrooms to libraries, OTS brought Space travel down to Earth for the 21,985 people who viewed it during its three years of grant-supported touring. After the exhibition, Outreach to Space will be available for rental to area groups for special events and programs. Contact  Mitch Luman, at 812-425-2406 for pricing and available dates.

 

 


 

Pair From Television’s CSI To Present Koch Memorial Lecture

September 15, 2012

 

Presented in partnership with the 
R. MALCOLM KOCH MEMORIAL LECTURE FUND

 

Since its debut in 2000, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation has been one of the most popular television shows in both the United States and around the world. On Saturday, September 15 at 7:00 p.m. the secrets of CSI are revealed as Lecturers, David Berman and Jon Wellner, take you inside the hit forensic drama.

Now, for the first time, these two actors/researchers will detail the exciting process of how each episode is created, from the story’s conception in the writers room all the way through post production and finally on to your television screen. You’ll learn how CSI is researched, and view excerpts from the show that illustrate how that research is incorporated into each episode.

Other topics of discussion include behind the scene stories about your favorite episodes, science vs. entertainment and the so-called “CSI effect”, and comparison of the fictional Universal Studios set with a real crime lab in Vegas. There will be a question and answer session following the program.

 

DAVID BERMAN, a Los Angeles native, attended college at Georgetown University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude with a double major in English and Theology. Along with researcher Jon Wellner, Berman maintains a database of over 300 professionals working in virtually all aspects of law enforcement. Berman has appeared as an actor in over 200 episodes of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation as assistant coroner David Phillips. He has also performed in such programs as Heroes, Profiler, and Vanished.

 

 

JON WELLNER hails from Chicago where he studied theater and performed at such renowned theaters as Second City and the Steppenwolf Theater. He moved to Los Angeles in 2000 and was soon working on television with roles on Bones, NCIS, Becker, Gilmore Girls, Yes, Dear, Judging Amy, That’s So Raven and more. In 2002, he played Gilligan in the movie of the week, Surviving Gilligan’s Island, which was the highest rated movie of the week that year. He can also be seen in the films Evan Almighty as well as Ocean’s 13. In 2004, Jon was cast as toxicologist Henry Andrews on CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.

 



 

 

Astronomy Day 2012

April 28, 2012

 

 

Presented in partnership with
PHILIP AND MICHELLE EYKAMP

In cooperation with
THE EVANSVILLE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY




Celebrate ASTRONOMY DAY on Saturday, April 28, 2012 when a trip to the Museum will allow for encounters with cool telescopes and astronomical activities for all ages. Knowledgeable volunteers will be on hand to help you observe, learn, discover, and explore the wonders of astronomy.

Daytime activities at the Museum will take place from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., and there will be plenty of family friendly events including make-it / take-it activities, telescope displays, and a meteorite display. The Koch Planetarium will host extra planetarium shows, and all tickets for the shows will be $1. Jim and Carol Havens from the Havens Foundation will provide free digital planetarium programs in their mobile immersive theater. Guests will also be able to view the Sun in the Museum’s parking lot with special telescopes that reveal sunspots, flares and prominences.

Later that evening the Moon, Venus, and Mars will be targets for telescopes and public viewing in the Museum’s parking lot. The Evansville Astronomical Society will be on hand with their telescopes, and will allow visitors to use them to view celestial objects in the sky above Evansville. The Evansville Astronomical Society will also be providing telescope training, so bring the family telescope to learn how to use it like an expert.

 

Astronomy Day Activities

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Meteorite and Photo Displays, Egg Drop, Astronomy Demos
11:00 - Noon, & 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Inflatable Planetarium Programs in the Old Gallery
11:00 a.m & 2:00 p.m. Make a Comet Demonstration
Noon - 2:00 p.m. Solar Observing
1:00 p.m. Eight Planets and Counting in the Koch Planetarium
3:00 p.m. The Sky Tonight in the Koch Planetarium
4:00 p.m. Eight Planets and Counting in the Koch Planetarium
8:00 p.m. Sky Watch from Museum Parking Lot

 

*Some portions of this event are subject to the prevailing weather conditions and may be canceled in the event of poor weather

 

 


 

Eight Planets and Counting

February 4 – May 27, 2012
 

 

Presented in partnership with the
ROBERT A. and SARA B. DAVIES FUND

So how many planets are there in our solar system? Nine, right? Or is it eight? The answer may surprise you. A few years back, the International Astronomical Union demoted Pluto – a planet for over seventy years – to a dwarf planet. So, is Pluto still a planet?

Our first planetarium program of 2012 examines the continuing debate over what constitutes a planet and exactly how many planets there are in the solar system. EIGHT PLANETS AND COUNTING looks at the variety of objects that populate our solar system and provides an up-to-date tour of the solar system.

Tour the solar system while enjoying spectacular photographs, exciting new discoveries beyond Pluto, and information that won’t be outdated next week.

Click HERE for a trailer of this show.

Presentations of Eight Planets and Counting will be offered in the Koch Planetarium Saturday and Sunday at 1:00 p.m. February 4 – May 27. Our program is a production from the Sudekum Planetarium in Nashville, Tennessee. Admission is free for Museum Members.

 


 

Season Of Light

December 3, 2009 – January 3, 2010

 

Presented IN LOVING MEMORY OF DR. AND MRS. H. S. DIECKMAN from their family VIRGINIA DIECKMAN LEZHNEV and ALEXANDER “SASHA” LEZHNEV.

 

Season of Light showcases historical, religious, and cultural rituals of winter — celebrations that bring warmth and light to the coldest and darkest season of the year. Along with a look at seasonal traditions, the show also details Winter constellations and examines astronomical explanations for “the Star of Bethlehem”.

 


 

Chemistry Day

Sunday, October 23, 2011

 

Ever wonder how chemicals react? Why do some things explode when you combine them and others do seemingly nothing? From simple to complex, chemical reactions play an important role in our daily life. Join us Sunday, October 23 from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. when we present our annual CHEMISTRY DAY in cooperation with the University of Southern Indiana. An observance of National Chemistry Week, Chemistry Day occurs each autumn.

At 1:00 p.m., Dr. Jeff Sieler, Professor of Chemistry at USI, will conduct exciting experiments such as Exploding Balloons, Elephant Toothpaste, Genie in a Bottle, and Burning Water. Following the show, USI students will offer hands-on children’s activities at stations throughout the Old Gallery.

 

 


 

Mars Update

August 27 – November 27

 

The Phoenix Lander

 

It has been seven years since the two Mars Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, touched down on Mars and began their mobile exploration of the red planet. Where are they now? Are they still working? Three years ago, another Lander, Phoenix touched down and operated for five months in the artic region of Mars. What did it find? In our Fall planetarium show, MARS UPDATE, we’ll answer these questions and in the process, share with our audience the latest news from Mars.

Our show begins with a fifteen-minute synopsis of how our views on Mars have changed over the years - from the writings of author H.G. Wells and Percival Lowell to the NASA robots, Spirit and Opportunity. We’ll see how a world that was once thought to be full of life and Earth-like was in reality a cold, dusty, dry planet.

Also included is a slide illustrated presentation detailing where you’ll find Mars in the current night sky, the current status of the Rovers, what they’ve discovered, and what other spacecraft have been, or will be doing on Mars. Our Mars Update planetarium show will be presented at 1:00 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday from August 27 – November 27

 


 

Laser Light Shows Return!

August 6 - 21

 

 

Presented in partnership with the 
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES
in cooperation with WABX EVANSVILLE’S CLASSIC ROCK

 

A generation ago, laser light shows were all the rage. A touchstone for the culture of the 70’s and 80’s, many have asked when will they return? After an absence of over twenty years, the Koch Planetarium offered its first laser light shows last Summer. In all, over 800 people attended our 2010 programs helping make it a huge success. Laser light shows return again to the Koch Planetarium August 6 - 21, adding one additional week and five new shows.

Periodic light shows are to be a part of the new Koch Immersive Theatre when it opens after the completion of our Reaching for the Stars Capital Campaign. We are offering light shows again this year to allow you to show your support for our current planetarium as it looks ahead to the future!

Ten different shows will be offered, with 41 shows total over ten days. Each show will feature multi-color, laser light effects and animations set to the beat of music, projected onto the dome with a backdrop of stars. Both matinee and evening programs are scheduled, including Legends of the Night Sky: Perseus and Andromeda, a special program for children. Our laser shows include music from artists such as the Beatles and Pink Floyd, Boston, Nirvana, Duran Duran, the B-52’s, the Chemical Brothers and dozens more. In all, seven will be compilation shows, featuring classic rock, modern rock, and pop music, one will be a U2 show, plus two Pink Floyd albums will be played in their entirety. The Pink Floyd albums include The Wall and Darkside of the Moon – which will have five midnight showings.

Admission is $5.00 for matinee presentations and $7.00 for any evening show, members will receive a special discount of $2 off. Tickets are available online, by mail, or in person at the Museum.

We do apologize to our Members but tickets purchased with a Members Discount are not available online. Discounted tickets can ONLY be purchased at the Museum with the presentation of  your valid Membership Card.

To purchase tickets at the door: You can buy tickets in advance in the Museum lobby. Cash, check, money order or credit cards accepted. The Museum is open Tuesday - Friday 11-5 ,Saturday 10-5, Sunday Noon-5 and during the evening on nights of light shows. The Museum is closed on Monday.

To order by telephone with a credit card: Call 812-425-2406. Your tickets will be mailed to you. A $1.00 museum fee per order applies.

 

2011 LASER LIGHT SHOWS

 

» SAT, AUG 6

2:00 p.m. Perseus and Andromeda

4:00 p.m. Laser Magic

7:00 p.m. Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

8:15 p.m. Hypnotica

9:30 p.m. Laseropolis

10:45 p.m. Pink Floyd: The Wall

Midnight Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

 

» SUN, AUG 7

2:00 p.m. Perseus and Andromeda

4:00 p.m. Laser Magic

 

» WED, AUG 10

7:00 p.m. Laser Retro

8:15 p.m. Laser Zeppelin

 

» FRI, AUG 12

7:00 p.m. Laser Retro

8:15 p.m. Laser Zeppelin

9:30 p.m. Laseropolis

10:45 p.m. Pink Floyd: The Wall

Midnight Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

 

» SAT, AUG 13

2:00 p.m. Perseus and Andromeda

4:00 p.m. Laser Beatles

7:00 p.m. Laser Retro

8:15 p.m. Laser Zeppelin

9:30 p.m. Laseropolis

10:45 p.m. Pink Floyd: The Wall

Midnight Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

 

» SUN, AUG 14

2:00 p.m. Perseus and Andromeda

4:00 p.m. Laser Beatles

 

» WED, AUG 17

7:00 p.m. Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

8:15 p.m. Hypnotica

 

» FRI, AUG 19

7:00 p.m. Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

8:15 p.m. Hypnotica

9:30 p.m. Laseropolis

10:45 p.m. Pink Floyd: The Wall

Midnight Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

 

» SAT, AUG 20

2:00 p.m. Perseus and Andromeda

4:00 p.m. Laser U2

7:00 p.m. Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

8:15 p.m. Hypnotica

9:30 p.m. Laseropolis

10:45 p.m. Pink Floyd: The Wall

Midnight Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

 

» SUN, AUG 21

2:00 p.m. Perseus and Andromeda

4:00 p.m. Laser U2

 


 

In Search of Intelligence

June 3 - August 21, 2011
Tuesday - Sunday at 1:00 P.M.
 

 

Presented in partnership with
JIM AND CAROL HAVENS

What is the definition of intelligence? And what qualifies as intelligence? In our planetarium program for summer, a young reporter gets the assignment of a lifetime to research intelligence should we ever detect signals from space. Instead of heading directly to the radio observatory, he visits a research station in the jungle before traveling to Hawai'i where he discovers that there are many more intelligent species on Earth than he first thought. When he finally does get to the observatory, he and the audience learn about the challenges of detecting signals from Space and use the Drake equation to consider the possibilities of actually making contact. The program is a production of the Sudekum Planetarium in Nashville.

Presentations of IN SEARCH OF INTELLIGENCE take place June 4 through August 21, Tuesday - Sunday at 1:00 p.m.  Admission is free to Museum Members with the presentation of a valid Membership Card.

In Search of Intelligence is a production of the Sudekum Planetarium in Nashville.

 


 

MoonWitch

January 8 - March 13, 2011

 

moon_witch_logo.gif

 

Presented  in partnership with
THE ALLEN GRAY CEMETERY TRUST

 

"And the ghosts and goblins ringing doorbells are not spirits but young two-legged costumed creatures in search of treasured candy..."

Have you ever noticed that, no matter where you go outdoors at night, the moon seems to follow you? While trick-or-treating one Halloween, Diana and her brother Billy notice just that! Diana and Billy are two characters in MOONWITCH, a family planetarium show all about the moon. From the moon’s strange faces to its changing appearance in the night sky, this program sets the record straight.

Written especially for children, MoonWitch features rich sound effects and an award-winning musical score that will have you tapping your toes! This show is perfect for families with young children ages 5 and up.

Presentations of MoonWitch take place each Saturday and Sunday afternoon at 1:00 p.m. through March 13. Admission is free to Museum Members with the presentation of a valid Membership Card. MoonWitch is a production of Bowen Technovation.

 

moon_witch_house.jpg

 


 

Your Spiting Image

September 26, 2010 – January 2, 2011

 

Presented in partnership with the
SOUTHWESTERN INDIANA ORAL HEALTH FOUNDATION

 

Healthy mouth, healthy body: these two topics are the subject of the traveling exhibition from the National Museum of Dentistry which will be on display from September 26, 2010 – January 2, 2011.  This exhibition highlights the importance of oral hygiene and the mouth-body connection.

Your Spitting Image reveals what your mouth says about you. Find out how forensic scientists use dental records and DNA analysis to solve real missing persons cases.  Discover the telling secrets revealed by saliva, while learning how your mouth is actually a window to health for your body.

The exhibition features animated video and other displays that explore the impact oral health can have on medical conditions such as diabetes. Visitors can assume forensic investigator roles, take a closer look at that most remarkable fluid of the mouth, and see how scientists use bioengineering to grow replacement teeth. And while you're there, try the exhibit's "sensory element".

"Advances in dentistry are making a positive impact on our lives, and this new traveling exhibition shows some of the ways these advances affect us all," says Rosemary Fetter, Executive Director of the National Museum of Dentistry. As part of a focus on a healthier Evansville, the exhibition shows how proper oral health can make a large difference in our community. We must recognize the efforts of local dentists, Dr. Steven W. Buedel and Dr. Brent Grafe for bringing this excellent exhibition to our attention and for their assistance in making this exhibition possible.

Your Spitting Image was created and produced by the Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.  Lead sponsorship for this exhibition generously provided by the Patterson Dental Foundation, Johnson & Johnson Consumer & Personal Products and Planmeca Inc. with additional support from Drs. Leslie W. Seldin and Constance P. Winslow, Dr. Laurence E. Johns and Dr. Robert J. Wilson.  Local assistance was received from Dr. Steven W. Buedel, DDS and Dr. Brent Grafe, DDS.

 


 

Outreach to Space

January 16 – April 1, 2010

 

Presented in partnership with the
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND

 

Initially made possible by a grant from the National Science Foundation, OUTREACH TO SPACE was designed as a collaborative project among ten U.S. museums and the respected exhibit designers at San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Built to withstand the rigors of family experimentation, the January 16 – April 17 Alcoa Gallery exhibition teaches adults and children about Space and Space travel through hands-on exploration.

One popular exhibit, Different Worlds, Different Weights, allows guests to compare the weight of an apple on Earth against the weight of an apple on other bodies in the Solar System. Another star attraction is Space Colony, which encourages children to use LEGO® brand blocks and a lot of imagination to construct their own visions for the future of Space exploration. Children and adults alike enjoy experimenting with Pressure Suit, allowing them to pump air out of the exhibit chamber and to observe two “Bug Out Bob” aliens inside, one fitted with a pressurized helmet and one exposed to the dropping pressure. Space suits worn by astronauts serve many important functions, including shielding the body from the vacuum of Space. Without a pressurized suit, the human body would expand to about two times its normal size.

From 2007 - 2010, the Outreach to Space project traveled to 35 fairs, festivals, and community events in the Tri-State area. From county fairs to classrooms to libraries, OTS brought Space travel down to Earth for the 21,985 people who viewed it during its three years of grant-supported touring. After the exhibition, Outreach to Space will be available for rental to area groups for special events and programs. Contact  Mitch Luman, at 812-425-2406 for pricing and available dates.

 


 

Oceans in Space

August 21 - November 21, 2010

 

Presented in partnership with the
ALLEN GRAY CEMETERY TRUST

 

Two of the most profound questions humans ask are “Where do we come from?” and “Are we alone?” It is only natural that we look across the gulfs of Space to search for other inhabited worlds.

From August 21 – November 21, OCEANS IN SPACE leads us on a journey that seeks out places in the Universe where conditions are ripe for life. This thought-provoking presentation highlights the search for extrasolar planets and provides an understanding of the conditions necessary to sustain life. The show is presented each Saturday and Sunday at 1:00 p.m.

The show travels back in time more than five billion years to trace the origin and evolution of our own solar system. It then describes the formation of our planet’s oceans and presents three requirements for the nourishment of life on Earth–and most likely anywhere else in the universe–warmth, water, and organic material. 

Today, life on Earth flourishes in environments ranging from familiar to downright alien. Our newest planetarium show examines the variety of life that populates our planet: from the creatures of the land, to organisms that exist in the extreme conditions around volcanic vents on the ocean floor. Could life exist in similar extreme environments elsewhere in our own solar system? 

The search for other life-bearing worlds moves to other star systems where known planets exist and illustrates techniques scientists use to look for extra solar planets. A science fiction-style ending portrays spaceship crews exploring the shores of an alien ocean far from Earth, in a scene taken from humanity’s distant future. 

Oceans In Space is an original work commissioned by the Springfield Library and Museums Association for the Seymour Planetarium of Springfield, Massachusetts, and was created by Loch Ness Productions.

 



Hands-On 4

May 2 - September 12, 2010

 

Hands On 4 Logo

 

Presented in partnership with the
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND

 

HANDS-ON 4 repeats a popular theme—participatory science. What began as a temporary exhibition of six interactive science exhibits 25 years ago has perennially proven to be one of the most popular areas at the Museum. While
our current ensemble of science exhibits in FamilyPlace continues to maintain a loyal following, from May 2 - September 12 we’ll bring back a few past exhibits as well as introduce several new exhibits to our audience.  

In all, a dozen exhibits will be fabricated or renovated for display in the Museum’s Alcoa Gallery. The exhibits include Static Electricity, an exhibit in which specially coated foam balls can be coaxed to roll around and jump-up-and down repeatedly with the wave of a hand, and Chaotic Pendulum, a magnet on a pendulum which resembles a torture device but in actuality is a clever demonstration of chaos theory.  Another exhibit, Size and Distance, demonstrates that the perceived size and distance of an object are intimately related to one another.

Other planned exhibits will certainly encourage various forms of experimentation. Hot and Cold will offer an illusion of a tactile nature. Place your hands on this exhibit, and you will sense something entirely different from what you’d expect from the warm and cold water that courses through a series of tightly wound copper pipes. Non-Round Rollers makes use of what seem to be very lopsided rollers that, when rolled on a special table, can be made to move with remarkable smoothness.  Conductivity allows for experimentation with solutions containing different dissolved substances to see which liquids allow electricity to pass.  

Hands-On 4 is the fourth in a series of hands-on exhibitions created in-house for our guests by the Science Staff at the Museum.  Exhibits designed by the Exploratorium, a leading science and technology center located in San Francisco, were the inspiration for many of the devices.

 


 

Nine Planets and Counting

June 5 - August 15, 2010

 

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Presented in partnership with the
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND



So, how many planets are there in our solar system? Nine, right? Or is it eight? The answer may surprise you. Since being demoted to a “dwarf planet” a few years back by the International Astronomical Union, Pluto—a planet for over seventy years—has experienced a change.  “Is Pluto still a planet?  

NINE PLANETS AND COUNTING presents the continuing debate on what constitutes a planet and exactly how many there are in the solar system.  Our program for Summer 2010 looks at the variety of objects that populate our solar system and provides an up-to-date tour of the solar system. The show utilizes a myriad of spectacular images and outlines several of the exciting new discoveries of named objects beyond Pluto.  

Presentations of Nine Planets and Counting will take place each Tuesday - Sunday at 1:00 p.m. from June 5 – August 15. Admission is free to Members with the presentation of a valid Membership card. The show is a production of the Sudekum Planetarium in Nashville, Tennessee.

 



Midwest Wild Weather

January 1 - April 18, 2010

 

Midwest Wild Weather

 

Presented in partnership with the
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND

 

Get ready for some really wild weather! The Museum’s popular traveling exhibition is about to blow into town. Created for a successful school outreach program conducted by the Museum, MIDWEST WILD WEATHER has been on tour to other museums during the past few years, but the collection of science exhibitions has returned for display again.

Continuing through April 18, visitors are able to see these dynamic weather exhibits in the Alcoa Gallery.  Built in 2000, the exhibits were used as a Museum outreach project from 2001 through 2002. During that time, they traveled to schools in an effort to improve science literacy of students and to assist teachers in teaching meteorology.  

In all, over 7,000 elementary and middle school students and teachers from 30 area schools benefited from the program. The components were designed to help people of all ages understand the ways of weather by focusing on wind and water, air and heat, light and sound. Using exhibits such as Tornado and Downdraft, visitors can see the effects of fast moving winds. Radar Tracking simulates the use of the Doppler radar used in tracking severe storms. Thunder simulates a bolt of lightning and challenges them to calculate the distance from a nearby thunderstorm, keeping in mind the differences between the speed of sound and the speed of light. Other displays allow visitors to create solar energy; observe hot air rising; blow snowdrifts; experiment with a Doppler Radar; and see what it is like to be a meteorologist using a working weather station.  

 


 

WORLDS IN MOTION

January 9 - March 7, 2010

 

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Presented in partnership with the
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND

 

One sun slips below the horizon while another sun waits its turn to set in this fanciful view of a planet within a double star system.

Join Couch and Ida Potato for an exploration of motion. From electrons zipping around the nucleus of an atom to our own galaxy zooming across the Universe, our first feature Koch Planetarium program of the year looks at how and why worlds move the way they do.

Made possible through a grant from the JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND,  WORLDS IN MOTION investigates Newton’s First Law of Motion, demonstrates basic celestial mechanics, and provides real-life examples of how everything in the Universe is constantly in motion. The half-hour presentation, suitable for children ages 11 and above and adults, features the late Winter and early Spring constellations such as Orion, Taurus and Leo.

Presentations of Worlds In Motion take place each Saturday and Sunday at 1:00 p.m. from January 9 – March 7. Admission is free to Members with the presentation of a valid Membership card.  This program is a production of the Sudekum Planetarium in Nashville, Tennessee.

 


 

Season Of Light

December 3, 2009 – January 3, 2010

 

Presented IN LOVING MEMORY OF DR. AND MRS. H. S. DIECKMAN from their family VIRGINIA DIECKMAN LEZHNEV and ALEXANDER “SASHA” LEZHNEV.

 

Season of Light showcases historical, religious, and cultural rituals of winter — celebrations that bring warmth and light to the coldest and darkest season of the year. Along with a look at seasonal traditions, the show also details Winter constellations and examines astronomical explanations for “the Star of Bethlehem”.



 

The Child Mummy

October 27 - November 29, 2009

 

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Few artifacts are as mysterious and captivating as Egyptian mummies, and Museum guests will have a chance to meet one this Fall. THE CHILD MUMMY, brought to Evansville under a special arrangement with the St. Louis Science Center, will be on display October 27 - November 29.

The St. Louis Science Center worked closely with an internationally-known anthropologist from Florida State University and a mummy specialist at The American University in Cairo, Egypt to study The Child Mummy. Their investigation revealed that the mummy is a boy who died at about seven to eight months old. He probably lived during the period of 40 BC to 130 AD, and was likely from an upper middle class or wealthy family since mummification was expensive.

 


 

Bad Astronomy: Myths and Misconceptions

June 6 – August 23, 2009

 

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Presented in partnership with the
JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND

 

Were the Apollo visits to the Moon actually a hoax? Have aliens ever landed on Earth? Can you tell your future by the stars? Prepare to tackle pseudoscience head-on with the new planetarium show BAD ASTRONOMY: MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS.

Presented in partnership with the JANE BROWNE PETERSEN FUND, the June 6 – August 23 planetarium program is based on the popular book and website of the same name.  Astronomer Dr. Phil Plait is the Bad Astronomer. He’s not a subject of the show and he’s not a “bad” astronomer — Dr. Plait just can’t stand to see bad astronomy in the movies, in commercials, and generally anywhere in our popular culture.  Bad Astronomy offers a unique and fun approach to learning about the cosmos. The Bad Astronomer himself will serve as our guide while offering a critical but light-hearted look at popular myths and misconceptions, revealing to audiences how science can be used to evaluate questionable claims. In order to set the record straight, Dr. Plait debunks urban legends such as the faked Moon landing, alien visits to Earth, and horoscopes that can predict your future.

 


 

Clouds of Fire: The Origin of Stars

March 28–May 3, 2009

 

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Presented in partnership with the
GRAY CEMETERY TRUST

 

“Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are …” The questions that we asked from our youngest days have intrigued humans for thousands of years. What is a star? Are all the stars the same? How do stars shine? From March 28–May 31, CLOUDS OF FIRE: THE ORIGIN OF STARS explores the intriguing connection between the formation of stars and everything in the Universe. Presented in partnership with the GRAY CEMETERY TRUST, the show will be featured in the Koch Planetarium Saturdays and Sundays at 1:00 p.m.

The origin of the Universe and its primary visual component—the stars—has fascinated astronomers throughout history. Scientists tell us the size of a star has considerable impact on how long it lives. A star’s color is also an indicator of how hot it is. Using these two criteria, much can be learned from a careful examination of the myriad of stars in the night sky.

Clouds of Fire explores the cycle of star birth and death and the inner workings that led to the formation of stars out of clouds of dust and gas. Over five billion years ago, our own solar system was formed out of such dust. The planets, Sun, comets, asteroids, and even the atoms and molecules of living things, all had their origin in the stars.