Archived Exhibitions

Art and Remembrance

 

Founders Bernice Steinhardt and Helene McQuade to Share Reflections on their Mother’s Art On Sunday, September 14, 2014 at 2:00 pm in the Old Gallery, the founders of Art and Remembrance, an arts and education non-profit based in Maryland, will present a program in conjunction with the exhibition THROUGH THE EYE OF THE NEEDLE: FABRIC OF SURVIVAL. Art and Remembrance was founded in 2003 to bring the work and story of Holocaust survivor and fabric artist Esther Nisenthal Krinitz to a wider audience. The founders wanted to maximize the educational potential of her art and unique story and promote the use of art and personal memoir as tools for promoting healing and awareness. Art and Remembrance was founded by Krinitz’s daughters, Bernice Steinhardt and Helene McQuade. Steinhardt and McQuade grew up with the stories of their mother’s courage and suffering as a child during the war. Years later, after Krinitz began to turn her stories into a narrated series of fabric art pictures, they realized the incredible power their mother’s art and her stitched narratives had. Together, art and story could help people understand what war and intolerance are and how they feel to those who endure them.

The organization has produced the nationally touring exhibition of Krinitz’s work, published the award-winning book Memories of Survival, developed and distributed curricula for students from elementary through high school and produced a multiple award-winning 30 minute documentary entitled Through the Eye of the Needle: The Art of Esther Nisenthal Krinitz.

 


 

Working Together

July 13 – August 24, 2014

 

Presented in memory of VIRGINIA B. LOWENTHAL

For the 21st consecutive year, regional artists will participate in a juried exhibition entitled WORKING TOGETHER. Presented in memory of Virginia B. Lowenthal, the July 13 – August 24 Old Gallery exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana. Juror for this year’s competition is Marianne Richter, executive director of the Swope Art Museum in Terre Haute, Indiana. Prior to coming to the Swope in 2011, she had over 20 years experience in curatorial positions at the Briscoe Western Art Museum in San Antonio, the Union League Club of Chicago, the Dayton Art Institute and the Brandywine River Museum in William Forsyth Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.

 


 

Suzanne Scherer & Pavel Ouporov

July 27 - August 24, 2014

 

Arabian Dance ,egg tempera, beads, moon gold on poplar panel
Suzanne Scherer & Pavel Ouporov, 2013, 25 x 25 inches

 

American-born Suzanne Scherer and Russian-born Pavel Ouporov will have an exhibition featuring their work in the Richardt  Room from July 27 – August 24. 

Scherer and Ouporov are a  collaborative team who met while studying at the Moscow Surikov State Academy Art Institute. Scherer earned a BFA from Florida State University, and an MFA from Brooklyn College. 

At age 11, Ouporov won admittance into the Moscow State Academy Art Lyceum. He graduated at 18 and earned a Master of Fine Arts from the  Moscow Surikov State Academy Art Institute.

Scherer and Ouporov have received  national and international recognition for their collaborative works and they  are represented in the permanent collections of many national and  international institutions. Their exhibition at the Museum will feature over a dozen works donated to the Museum in 2010 by Dr. Richard Daigle, as well as several recent works.

 


 

Amy Musia Sculpture

March 30 – July 6

 

 

Sculptor, designer, and photographer Amy Musia specializes in site specific works of art for healthcare environments, public spaces and corporate and private collections. In her 30-year career, Musia has completed numerous public commissions including Bend in the River on Evansville’s riverfront. Her sculpture is included in the Evansville Museum’s permanent collection and has been exhibited in competitive and invitational exhibitions across the country.

A graduate of the University of Southern Indiana, Amy Musia serves on the Evansville Public Art Commission and has been an active member of the Evansville Greenway Art Committee. She is represented by the Begley Art Source, a division of the Evansville Museum Shop.

New work by this accomplished Evansville artist will be featured from March 30 – July 6 in the John Streetman Alcove.

 


 

Artist In Residence

March 30 – July 6

 

Presented in partnership with the MARTHA AND MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION, the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION in memory of JOHN J. DAUS, JR. and the ROBERT G. GRAVES FAMILY, in honor of VIRGINIA G. SCHROEDER

For two decades, the Martha and Merritt deJong Foundation has supported the Museum’s artist residency program. In celebration of this commitment to bringing artists from across the United States to Evansville to exhibit their work and conduct weeklong classes, this year’s exhibition showcases work by all twenty artists.

The March 30 – July 6 Main Gallery exhibition will be drawn from the Museum’s permanent collection and will feature new paintings, drawings and prints on loan from many of the artists. 

 


 

High School Art Show

March 13 – April 13

 

Presented in partnership with ROBERT B. and MARIANNA S. WRIGHT in memory of SHIRLEY K. WRIGHT (1929-2003), in cooperation with the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD and ANITA DUNCAN

For 51 years, the Museum has honored young artists from southwestern Indiana through the presentation of the HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW. Students currently enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 in public and private schools in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Pike, Posey, and Gibson Counties in Indiana will enter work in the categories of painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, ceramics, photography and commercial design.

The March 13 – April 13 Old Gallery exhibition will open with an awards reception on Thursday, March 13 at 7 p.m. Volunteers from the Museum Guild and Museum Docent Association anticipate nearly 800 entries for review by juror Alisa Holen, associate professor of art at the University of Southern Indiana.

 


 

Posing Beauty

January 19, 2014 – March 16, 2014

 

 

From January 19 – March 16, the Museum will host POSING BEAUTY IN AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE as part of our 30 year tradition of presenting art and history exhibitions in conjunction with the celebration of Black History Month.

The exhibition includes over 80 photographs dating from the 1890s through the present which explore the ways in which African American beauty has been represented in historical and contemporary contexts through photography, film, video, fashion, advertising and other forms of popular culture including music and the Internet. The images challenge idealized forms of beauty in art by examining a variety of attitudes about race, class, gender, popular culture and politics.

Posing Beauty teaches us about the historic ways photography allowed a people to change the negative image of themselves in the culture at large. It helps us to understand, as exhibition curator Dr. Deborah Willis observes, “the extent to which the medium allowed people, even in times of oppression, to experiment with varied ideas of themselves and ultimately honor how they saw themselves and wished to be seen by others.”

Programs and exhibitions to complement the exhibition will be presented by the Evansville African American Museum, the Girl Scouts of Southwest Indiana and the YWCA.

This exhibition is organized by Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibitions, Pasadena, California, and curated by Dr. Deborah Willis.

 


 

East/West/North: A Collaboration

December 15, 2013 – March 2, 2014

 

Presented in partnership with IVY TECH COMMMUNITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF EVANSVILLE, and UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN INDIANA

University art faculty collaboration marks 27th anniversary in this Old Gallery exhibition. Over 40 members of the art faculties from the eastside campus of the University of Evansville, the Westside campus of the University of Southern Indiana, and the northside campus of IVY Tech Community College join together to present their current work in this highly anticipated 27th annual collaborative exhibition.

 


 

43rd Mid-States Craft Exhibition

December 15, 2013 – January 12, 2014

 

Presented in partnership with an ANONYMOUS FOUNDATION
in cooperation with BRADLEY AND JACQUELINE GORDON and FRANK AND PAULINE AMODIO

                                                                                

The 43rd MID-STATES CRAFT EXHIBITION will be featured in the Main Gallery. Open to artists residing in the six states of Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, and Missouri, the competition will feature ceramics, glass, textiles, metalwork, wood, and mixed media.

Juror for this year’s competition will be Julie Farr, executive director of the Houston (Texas) Center for Contemporary Craft. A non-profit arts organization founded in 2001 to advance education about the process, product and history of craft, HCCC has emerged as an important cultural and educational resource for Houston and the Southwest – one of the few venues in the country dedicated exclusively to craft at the highest level.

Nearly $10,000 in purchase and merit awards, underwritten by Evansville individuals, corporations, foundations, and philanthropic organizations, will be presented at the December 14 awards evening.

Mid-States Craft Juror Julie Farr will host a presentation on the 2013 Mid-States Craft Exhibition on Tuesday, November 5, at 7 p.m. in the Museum’s Old Gallery.

 


 

Enfolded: Dialogues of Vision and Voice

September 22 – November 24, 2013

 


MU!Dobree Adams, Handwoven Wool

 

Presented in partnership with the WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR. AND PHYLLIS R. GRIMM CHARITABLE TRUST

From their separate worlds, their life together on a Kentucky River farm north of Frankfort, their travels and their common interests, weaver/ photographer Dobree Adams and poet/publisher/book designer Jonathan Greene have forged a unique multi-faceted collaboration of vision and voice. The Main Gallery exhibition Enfolded: Dialogues of Vision and Voice will feature the tapestries and photographs of Dobree Adams intertwined with Jonathan Greene’s poems.


Koi PondDobree Adams, Archival inkjet print

Adams, long recognized as one of Kentucky’s finest contemporary fiber artists, has had exhibitions of her work in Japan and New York. Her one of- a-kind tapestries are hand woven from handspun yarns in the natural colors of the Lincoln Longwool sheep as well as yarns that have been hand painted in the skein using a Japanese brush. For 20 years she raised and exhibited a prize-winning flock of Lincolns, one of the oldest British breeds and renowned for the length, strength and luster of its wool.

Adams’ work has been included in the Evansville Museum’s “Mid-States Craft Exhibition” four times and received awards twice. Since 2003, she has also exhibited her photography and is one of the co-founders of the Kentucky Women Photographers Network.

In the placid pond
clouds float, koi glide.
Throw in some feed,
the pond seethes.
— Jonathan Greene

Greene, author of over 30 books, is the publisher of Gnomon Press, a small press specializing in literature and photography. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Southern Federation of State Arts Agencies, and two grants from the Kentucky Arts Council. His poems, essays and translations have appeared in scores of magazines and journals, including The Merton Annual, Quarterly Review of Literature, and The American Literary Anthology.

 

 


 

Frank Lloyd Wright's Samara:
A Mid-Century Dream Home

September 29 – December 8, 2013

 

 

The Evansville Museum will host a nationally touring exhibition on the work of the internationally known American architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) in the Old Gallery.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Samara: A Mid-Century Dream Home is the story of how a young couple from Lafayette, Indiana and a world-famous architect worked together to build what was, for John and Catherine Christian, truly their dream home. It is also the story of how the family continued to honor the architect’s vision long after his death. They named their home “Samara,” which is derived from a winged, or whirligig, seed. The house is still a work in progress today.

Dr. John E. and Catherine (Kay) Christian, a Purdue University professor and his wife, had followed and admired Wright’s work and they were sure they wanted him to design their dream home. But with a limited budget, was their project too small for such a renowned figure? It took some convincing, but following a series of memorable meetings between 1950 and 1952 and after a flurry of correspondence, Wright accepted the commission. He suggested one of his Usonian designs. First conceived by Wright in the 1920s, the Usonian house (an abbreviation for “United States of North America”) was meant to be a modest-sized, environmentally sensitive dwelling affordable to middle class families.

Told through the juxtaposition of original objects and furniture, architectural fragments, rare archival materials, historic photographs, and video footage, Frank Lloyd Wright's Samara: A Mid-Century Dream Home explores the creation of a Frank Lloyd Wright house in Indiana through the eyes of clients who spent more than 50 years fulfilling the architect’s Usonian vision.

In 1954, Frank Lloyd Wright said, “I believe a house is more a home by being a work of art.” How does one live in a work of art? Museum visitors will experience the process of building and living in a home designed by America’s greatest 20th century architect. The exhibition also explores how the home and its furnishings exemplified Wright’s philosophies about the relationship between architecture and nature, ranging from the extensive use of windows and terraces to the origins of the design motif of the samara seed.

This family-oriented exhibition will consist of over 117 works including furnishings, photographs, drawings, family memorabilia and interactives, such as large, colorful stacking wooden blocks so visitors can mimic the Samara elevation and floor plan in their own block model.

This exhibition is a Program of ExhibitsUSA, a national division of Mid-America Arts Alliance and The National Endowment for the Arts.

 


 

David Rodenberg Ceramics

April 28 – August 25, 2013

 

GOLDEN DRAGON, Porcelain, David Rodenberg

 

 

The ceramics of gifted Evansville artist and educator David Rodenberg will be featured in the Alcove Gallery. Rodenberg taught art at North Posey High School for 34 years, retiring in 2011. Working primarily in clay, both in sculptural and functional forms, his work may been seen in the public and corporate collections of the Evansville Museum, University of Indianapolis, University of Evansville, First Presbyterian Church, Evansville Courier & Press, and Old National Bank. In recent years, the artist has also worked in oils, watercolors and pastels.

Rodenberg’s work has been accepted into the Evansville Museum’s highly regarded regional competition Mid-States Craft eight times, winning purchase awards in 1991 and 2003. His ceramics have been included in international exhibitions in New Zealand, Germany, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. In 2011 – 2012, Rodenberg served as guest curator for Peace Rider Reunion: Contemporary European and American Ceramic Art which was exhibited in Osnabruck, Germany and in Evansville at the University of Southern Indiana.

David Rodenberg received both his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees from the University of Evansville after service in the United States Air Force. In 1996, he was named Art Educator of the Year by the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana. 

 


 

Peg Fierke and Robert Eagerton
Artist in Residence

July 21 – September 15

 

ProbabilitiesPeg Fierke, oil on canvas, 66” x 80”

 

Un-caged, Robert Eagerton, Oil on canvas mounted on aluminum panel, 44 x 50.5 inches

 

Presented in partnership with the MARTHA AND MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION and the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION in memory of JOHN J. DAUS, JR.

The Artist’s Residency is presented in partnership with the ROBERT G. GRAVES FAMILY in honor of VIRGINIA G. SCHROEDER

A collaborative exhibition featuring the work of Indianapolis artists Peg Fierke and Robert Eagerton will be presented in the Old Gallery. Both experienced artists who began their careers using traditional printmaking methods, Fierke and Eagerton have continued their artistic development using technology as a tool in their art making. Each artist taught at Herron School of Art and Design at Indiana University- Purdue University Indianapolis for roughly 40 years and have a common approach to making art: a lifelong process of exploration that lets the process, rather than a preconceived end product, shape their imagery.

Eagerton co-founded Transfiguration Press in Sarasota, Florida, one of the first printmaking workshops specializing in hand-drawn lithographs, etchings and fine art photography. Fierke has also worked outside the confines of academia, having developed interdisciplinary classes in philosophy and physiology and teaching in New York City, Europe, British Columbia, and Ireland. Both artists have extensive national and international exhibition records and their work is included in museum collections around the country.

 


 

Working Together

July 28 – September 15

 

Presented in memory of VIRGINIA B. LOWENTHAL

For the 20th consecutive year, regional artists will participate in a juried exhibition entitled WORKING TOGETHER. The Old Gallery exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana.

Juror for this year’s competition is Garry Holstein, director of the New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art, a part of the University of Southern Indiana’s Division of Outreach and Engagement. Before his arrival in Evansville, Holstein was visiting professor of Art at Arkansas Tech University. He received his Master of Fine Art degree in Visual Design and a Master of Art in Organizational Communication from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville.

Holstein was the founding director of the University of Arkansas’ outreach gallery, sUgAR, in Bentonville and has organized exhibitions on the local, regional, and national levels that encompassed student and faculty members, as well as other professional contemporary artists.

 


2013 High School Art Show

March 14 – April 14, 2013

 

Presented in memory of 
SHIRLEY K. WRIGHT (1929-2003)
by ROBERT B. and MARIANNA S. WRIGHT
in partnership with ANITA DUNCAN
and the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD

 

For fifty years, the Museum has honored young artists from southwestern Indiana through the presentation of the HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW. Students currently enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 in public and private schools in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Pike, Posey, and Gibson Counties in Indiana will enter work in the categories of painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, ceramics, photography, and commercial design.

The Old Gallery exhibition will open with an awards reception on Thursday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. Volunteers from the Museum Guild and Museum Docent Association anticipate nearly 800 entries for review by juror Patrick Flaherty, the Director of Exhibitions & Artist Services at the Indianapolis Art Center.

 


 

High School Art Teachers Show

March 14 – April 14, 2013

 

Presented in partnership with 
ANITA DUNCAN
in cooperation with THE EVANSVILLE RETIRED TEACHERS ASSOCIATION

 

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Evansville Museum’s annual High School Art Show, art faculty from the 18 participating high schools have been invited to exhibit their own art in a Main Gallery exhibition. “It is a privilege,” says Mary McNamee Bower, the Interim Director, “to share with our community artwork by these thirty art educators who work so diligently each year to make the High School Art Show a success.”

 


 

Malcolm Mobutu Smith: Improvisations

February 10 – March 10, 2013

 

MOLTEN, Ceramic, Malcolm Mobutu Smith

 

Event Underwriter: IU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION GREATER EVANSVILLE CHAPTER; Cream & Crimson Sponsors: TRI-STATE ORTHOPAEDICSNICHOLSON, MCNAMARA & ASSOCIATES MERRILL LYNCH ADVISORS; and the IU COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ALUMNI BOARD.

 

 

Indiana University Associate Professor of Art Malcolm Mobutu Smith is in a solo Main Gallery exhibition, Malcolm Mobutu Smith: Improvisations, through March 10. Smith has been a member of the IU faculty since 2001, coming to Indiana after teaching ceramics for five years at Western Kentucky University. He earned his Master of Fine Arts degree in 1996 from New York State College – Alfred University. The Evansville Museum was first introduced to Smith’s work when he was selected to show in our regional juried Mid-States Craft Exhibition in both 1997 and 2000.

A primary part of the Museum’s 2013 celebration of Black History Month, the exhibition features ceramics which are both wheel-thrown and hand-built forms. Smith describes his abstracted cups, bottles and vases as “improvisations” that are inspired by his interests in jazz, graffiti art and his multi-ethnic identity.

“A student and artist of ceramics for nearly 30 years, I have an intimate connection and sensitivity to the tactile process of making art objects. Much of my working mode involves loosely harnessing the plastic potential of clay and its anachronistic capacity to encode moments of touch and circumstance. Like an open sketchbook, the confluence of forms and images compressing into or extending out from my work are a collage of ideas some filtered from varying ceramic tradition; theoretical concepts of abstraction; the art of drawing; and still others from the velocity of poplar culture and societal encounters.”
                                                                             --Malcolm Mobutu Smith

 For additional information about Malcolm Mobutu Smith and images of his work visit www.malcolmMobutusmith.com.

 

 


 

56th Mid-States Art Exhibition

December 9, 2012 - March 3, 2013

 

Presented in partnership with an 
ANONYMOUS FOUNDATION

 

The 56th MID-STATES ART EXHIBITION is a regional competition open to artists in a six-state area including Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. The exhibition will run from December 9, 2012 – March 3, 2013.

Over $7,000 in purchase and merit awards, underwritten by Evansville individuals, corporations, foundations and philanthropic organizations, will be presented during the December 15th awards evening. Purchase awards allow the Museum to acquire works for our contemporary art collection, and merit awards are important encouragement and recognition for regional artists.

Juror for the competition is artist and author Peter Plagens. A painter who has shown with the Nancy Hoffman Gallery in New York since 1974, Plagens was also the staff art critic for Newsweek (1989-2003). He has received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (painting), the National Endowment for the Arts (painting, art criticism), The Andy Warhol Foundation/Creative Capital (arts writing), and the National Arts Journalism Program. Plagens is the author of two books of art criticism — Sunshine Muse: Art on the West Coast, 1945-70 and Moonlight Blues: An Artist’s Art Criticism — as well as a novel, Time for Robo. His online novel, The Art Critic, will be published as an e-book by Hol Art Books this year, and his book on the artist Bruce Nauman will be published by Phaidon in 2013. He lives in New York City with his wife, the painter Laurie Fendrich.

 


 

The Collector’s Eye: Bronzes from the Collection of Kenneth Drew

January 18 - April 21, 2013

 

Presented in partnership with the 
WILLIAM C.H. GRIMM, JR. AND PHYLLIS R. GRIMM CHARITABLE TRUST

 

One of our region’s most highly regarded art collectors, Kenneth Drew shares selected works from his broad collection of 19th – 20th century figurative sculpture in the exhibition.

Presented in the second floor Alcove Gallery, this exhibition will feature American, French and Russian sculpture including the 1895 bronze Venus and Adonis by celebrated artist Frederick MacMonnies (1863-1937).

 

 


 

 

 

Seeing Ourselves: The Sill Lifes of Eric Forstmann

December 9, 2012 – February 3, 2013

 

 

Presented in partnership with an 
ANONYMOUS FOUNDATION

 

For the Sharon, Connecticut artist Eric Forstmann, everyday items like kitchen goods on a shelf, a simple arrangement of fruit, or his well-known series of shirts hanging on a wall, are worthy subject matter in his lustrous paintings. Forstmann challenges the viewer to look again at the beauty found all around us.

John O’Hern, the Santa Fe Editor of American Art Collector, describes Forstmann and his work, “My long-held belief is that something of the artist inevitably lives in his art and is experienced by the viewer. [Eric’s] paintings embody his intention to make us see what he thinks we may have overlooked or to see familiar objects again in a new context. They do that well. We construct our own narratives about the objects which are sometimes randomly and sometimes carefully arranged on tabletops and within cubbies. In our lives we may not give the objects a second glance, but in Eric’s paintings we are invited to look at them as they relate to one another in size, shape, and color, animated by light and shadow. The paintings are gentle but engaging, humorous but thoughtful. In this way they echo the personality of their maker.”

Forstmann studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston/Tufts University. His work is found in numerous public and private collections, including the Butler Institute ofAmerican Art, Youngstown, Ohio; Mr. Kevin Bacon and Ms. Kyra Sedgwick, New York; Ms. Jane Curtain, Connecticut; Mr. and Mrs. Sam Waterston, Connecticut; and Mr. and Mrs. Don Gummer, New York. 

 


Wooden Wonders: The Sculpture of John McNaughton

August 5 – December 30, 2012

 

FAT HOUSE
Cedar, cherry, & walnut, 2011
John McNaughton

 

Presented in partnership with 
BARBARA BLEVINS and DAN DEPYATIC

 

Work drawn from private collections in Evansville and selected award-winning pieces in the Museum’s Permanent Collection by celebrated artist John McNaughton will be on exhibit in the 2nd floor Alcove Gallery from August 5 – December 30.

In 2005, after a 35 year teaching career as a Distinguished Professor of Art at the University of Southern Indiana, Evansville artist John McNaughton retired from teaching. He has exhibited his work internationally and is represented in more than 300 museums, corporate and private collections, including the Smithsonian Institution. The cor-ten steel sculpture entitled Flowing River, in the Museum’s riverside garden, is one of eight public sculptures by McNaughton in the Evansville community.

McNaughton completed his undergraduate work at Ball State University and earned master’s degrees from Bowling Green State University and Ball State University. In 2003, he received the Distinguished Professor Award from the University of Southern Indiana and, in 1998, was named the Art Educator of the Year by the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana.

 


 

East/West/North: A Collaboration

October 7 - November 25, 2012

 

PISAC MARKET #2
Oil on canvas
Michael K. Aakhus
University of Southern Indiana

 

Presented in partnership with the 
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES

 

The October 7 – November 25 Old Gallery exhibition EAST/WEST/NORTH: A COLLABORATION brings together over 40 members of the art faculties from the eastside campus of the University of Evansville, the westside campus of the University of Southern Indiana, and the northside campus of IVY Tech State College. They join together to present their current work in this highly anticipated 26th annual exhibition.

 


 

Faces Not Forgotten: A Tribute to James Thomas Poindexter

August 26 – November 25, 2012

 

 

The paintings of one of our region’s most important 19th century artists, James Thomas Poindexter (1832-1891), will be revisited as part of the City of Evansville’s Bicentennial Celebration. This August 26 – November 25 Main Gallery exhibition is organized with the assistance of New Albany, Indiana native Hannah Ganote who graduated from the University of Evansville in May with a degree in Writing and a minor in Art.

Drawn from the Evansville Museum’s holdings of twelve works by the artist, the exhibition also will include portraits from museums and libraries in Evansville and New Harmony, Indiana and Louisville, Kentucky.

In the August 4, 1852 issue of the Evansville Daily Journal, a single line announced that “Poindexter, a portrait painter, has come to town.” At the age of twenty, James Thomas Poindexter launched his career as a professional artist in this community. He had spent the first two decades of his life in or near Hopkinsville, Kentucky where he was born. Little is known about James Poindexter’s early life and education, but it is believed that he had little or no formal art education. His art grew out of the American tradition of itinerant limners, those traveling artisans who moved from one community to another, soliciting commissions for portraits or signs in exchange for a modest fee and sometimes room and board.

In 1852 Poindexter married Nancy Marshall of Eddyville, Kentucky and shortly afterwards crossed the Ohio River to settle in Evansville. His popularity soon flourished, prompting him to announce just one year later his intention to expand his business to include daguerreotypes.

With a studio on Main Street, Poindexter concentrated his work in creating portraits of the citizens of Southwestern Indiana until 1882. The Evansville City Directory of 1858 notes that the artist lived at the corner of Mulberry and Third Streets. His career was interrupted by the Civil War and he left Evansville to serve in the Army of the Confederacy as a telegraph operator. When the war ended, Poindexter spent some time working as a portraitist in Louisiana and Mississippi before returning to Evansville in 1871. After 1882, Poindexter’s name disappears from Evansville’s City records. He died in Eddyville, Kentucky in 1891.

 

 


 

Working Together

July 29 - September 23, 2012

 

Presented in memory of 
Virginia B. Lowenthal

 

For the 19th consecutive year, regional artists will participate in a juried exhibition entitled WORKING TOGETHER. The July 29 – September 23 Old Gallery exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana.

Juror for this year’s competition is Patrick Flaherty, the Director of Exhibitions & Artist Services at the Indianapolis Art Center. Flaherty curates and manages five gallery spaces and a 9.5 acre outdoor ArtsPark. He also directs the nationally recognized Broad Ripple Art Fair, which is the Art Center’s largest annual fundraiser and brings over 225 artists, four stages of live entertainment, and over 30 food vendors to Indianapolis each May. Flaherty received an MA in Printmaking from Ball State University in 2003. His undergraduate work earning a BFA in Printmaking was completed at Ball State University and the University of Connecticut.

Active as a professional teaching artist, Flaherty is the head of the printmaking department at the Indianapolis Art Center and is an adjunct faculty member at Ivy Tech Community College in Indianapolis, Indiana. He exhibits his own work in Indianapolis and regionally and performs regularly with Gamblin’ Christmas, a band he co-founded in 2004. Examples of his artwork may be found at www.arkipress.com.

For a prospectus and details about how artists may participate in this annual competition in the future, call the Curatorial Department at (812) 425-2406 ext. 237.

 


 

The Wry Theatre of Robert Jackson

May 27 - August 19

 

DAREDEVIL
Oil on linen, 2006
Museum Purchase with funds from the Charles Young Trust

 

Presented in partnership with the 
MARTHA AND MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION

and the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION 
in memory of JOHN J. DAUS, JR.

The Artist’s Residency is sponsored by the 
ROBERT G. GRAVES FAMILY in honor of VIRGINIA G. SCHROEDER


Robert C. Jackson, described by Evansville Museum Director John Streetman as “among our most important mid-career American realist painters,” has been selected as the Museum’s 2012 Martha and Merritt deJong Memorial Artistin- Residence. In conjunction with his residency and weeklong classes, THE WRY THEATRE OF ROBERT JACKSON will be featured in the Main Gallery May 27 – August 19.

The Evansville Museum’s connection with still life painter Robert C. Jackson began in 2007 when he was one of 15 American realist painters who we invited to participate in a major touring exhibition, Object Project, organized by our Museum. Jackson’s landmark work from that exhibition, entitled “Daredevil,” a masterful combination of stunning technique and quirky imagery, was purchased by the Museum for our permanent collection. The five objects required for inclusion in each of the Object Project works – a ball of string, a mirror, a moth, a glass of water, and an animal bone – are included in this painting in a most amusing narrative.

Jackson writes about his paintings, “Laughter is worth pursuing. If art is to feed our souls and assist us in encountering our humanity, then a balanced part of our diets should be humor. There is an immeasurable amount of healing, depth, and truth to laughter or a smile. I aim to affirm reality, yet offer hope and a laugh. My characters show us our foibles and sometimes make big issues easier to swallow. Hopefully we are able to laugh the hardest at ourselves.”

After graduating in 1986 from the University of Delaware with a degree in Electrical Engineering, Jackson began his career as a radio systems engineer with Motorola. He felt called to leave the engineering field
after five years to pursue another career track, working the next six years as an assistant pastor for the Cedar Ridge Community Church in Spencerville, Maryland.

Since 1997, Jackson has been a full time artist and has exhibited his work throughout the United States. He lives in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania with his wife, Suzanne, who is an opera singer, and their three children.

For additional information about Robert C. Jackson and images of his paintings: www.robertcjackson.com.

 


 

Cast in Bronze:

The Figurative Sculpture of Gino Miles

April 16 – July 29

 

ONE OF A KIND REJUVINATION
Bronze

 

Presented in partnership with 
JUDGE & MRS. RICH D'AMOUR.

 

The exhibition CAST IN BRONZE: THE FIGURATIVE SCULPTURE OF GINO MILES will be in the Museum’s
Second Floor Alcove Gallery from April 16 – July 29.

Colorado native Gino Miles became interested in art while attending the University of Northern Colorado. His study of painting and sculpture took him to Italy, where he took classes at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence and at the Universitá per Stranieri di Perugia. Greatly influenced by the ancient ruins and art of the Etruscans, Romans and Greeks, Miles became fascinated with the rich cultural relationship between sculpture, architecture and the surrounding landscape.

Miles returned to the United States and received his Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Northern Colorado in 1979. He and his wife spent several years in Europe before settling in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1983. He established a successful foundry business and, in 2003, he opened Sculpture 619, a gallery on Canyon Road in the heart of Santa Fe’s art district.

For additional information about Gino Miles and images of his sculpture: www.sculpture619.com

 


 

Beauty, Joy, and Wonder: The Sculpture of Ann Weber

April 29 - July 22, 2012

 

 

Presented in partnership with the 
WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR. and PHYLLIS R. GRIMM CHARIT ABLE TRUST

Artist Ann Weber, who grew up in Evansville, is a petite woman with an infectious charm. As a sculptor, her tools are a $25 Arrow P-22 stapler, a box cutter, polyurethane and piles of cardboard she’s pulled from trash bins around her neighborhood in Emeryville, California.

Cutting the cardboard into strips and stapling the pieces together, Weber creates large scale sculptures which are acclaimed for their organic shape, intricate design and innovative use of materials. She was drawn to the challenge of making beauty from something so common and ubiquitous as cardboard. Crediting her Hoosier roots, Weber laughs as she recalls the old adage, “We Midwesterners are known for our ability to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.”

Weber’s solo exhibition BEAUTY, JOY, AND WONDER: THE SCULPTURE OF ANN WEBER will be featured in the Museum’s Old Gallery from April 29 – July 22.

Weber graduated from Purdue University, earning a BA in Art History in 1972, and went on to study at the New School of Social Research in New York. She began her career working with clay as a medium, creating utilitarian ceramics in upstate New York for nearly a decade and, later, operating a production pottery business in New York City. Inspired by an exhibition at the Whitney Museum of the monumental work of ceramicist Viola Frey, Weber moved to Oakland, California to study with Frey at the California College of Arts and Crafts. There she earned her MFA in Ceramics in 1987.

Weber recalls, “I started working in cardboard in 1991 because I wanted to make large forms and wanted to eliminate the cumbersome process of clay and the weight of large clay objects. The sculptures read as metaphors for life experiences such as the balancing acts that define our lives or how far you can go with something before it collapses.”

Weber’s massive cardboard sculptures astound viewers with her inventiveness and remind us of the capacity for unexpected transformations. She notes, “I love the simplicity of cardboard. I love how it invites you to see things differently.”

For additional information about Weber and images of her sculpture: www.annwebersculpture.com

Ann Weber will present an illustrated lecture about her work to the public at 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 29, at a Champagne Brunch at the Museum.

 


 

High School Art Show

March 15 - April 15

 

 

Presented in partnership with 
ROBERT B. and MARIANNA S. WRIGHT
in memory of SHIRLEY K. WRIGHT (1929-2003)

in cooperation with the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD

Now in its 49th year, the HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW continues the tradition of honoring young artists from our region. Students currently enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 in public and private schools in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Pike, Posey, and Gibson Counties in Indiana will enter work in the categories of painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry,textiles, ceramics, photography and commercial design.

The March 15 – April 15 Old Gallery exhibition will open with an awards reception on Thursday, March 15 at 7:00 p.m. Volunteers from the Museum Guild and Museum Docent Association anticipate nearly 800 entries for review by this year’s juror, Becky Alley, Exhibitions and Programs Director for the Lexington Art League (LAL) in Lexington, Kentucky.

Alley earned a Bachelor of Fine Art degree in studio art from Washington University in 2000, and a Master of Fine Art from the University of Kansas in 2005. Before joining the LAL staff in January 2010, Alley was the Director of University Galleries at Murray State University for nearly four years. She has organized over 100 shows and has curated several major projects including Think Tank, an international show of political art. She has also exhibited her artwork in several galleries across the United States as well as in South Korea and China, and most recently had a solo exhibition titled COUNT at Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania.

 

 


 

EXPLORING ELEMENTS: STONE/WOOD/BRONZE

February 1 – April 1, 2012

 

FREE SPIRIT
Bronze

 

The hand carved wood and cast bronze sculpture of John Evans will be featured in a February 1 – April 1 exhibition EXPLORING ELEMENTS: STONE/WOOD/BRONZE in the Museum’s Second Floor Alcove Gallery.

A sculptor for over 20 years, Evans maintains a studio just outside Columbus, Ohio, in what were originally the outbuildings that surround his mid-19th century Italianate country home. A native of Ohio, Evans received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Ohio University in Athens and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Instituto Allende at the University of Guanajuato in Mexico. His major artistic influences include the sculptors Henry Moore, Constantin Brancusi, Clement Meadmore and David Hostetler, his professor and mentor at Ohio University.

Evans comments, “Initially, my goals were to simply carve wood in such a way as to create an illusion with the process itself – almost as if I had just twisted the wood into its new form by hand instead of carving it. These explorations evolved into various themes and my primary interests are the capturing of motion in time, emotional expression, and investigating the potential of two dimensional ideas in three dimensional space.”

Represented by galleries in Nantucket, Massachusetts and Columbus, Ohio, Evans produces work for corporate and private collections throughout the United States.

For additional information about John Evans and photographs of his sculpture: www.evanssculpture.com

 


 

City Lights: The Photographs Of John Dowell

January 22 – March 4, 2012

 

SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ MONUMENT

Indianapolis, Inkjet print

 

Presented in partnership with an 
ANONYMOUS FOUNDATION



The Evansville Museum’s 2012 art exhibition series opens with the January 22 – March 4 Old Gallery presentation of CITY LIGHTS: THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF JOHN DOWELL. Philadelphia native and Professor of Printmaking at the prestigious Tyler School of Art at Temple University, John Dowell captures the pulse of various American cities in his large scale color photographs.

Dowell has worked as an artist for over four decades. A master printmaker whose prints, paintings and photographs have been featured in 49 one person exhibitions, he is represented in the permanent collections of 70 museum and public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Boston Museum, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris, France. Dowell’s photographs have been added to the collections of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Fogg Museum of Harvard University, the Museum of the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Lehigh University Museum.

Dowell writes about his current imagery of American cities at night, “There is an excitement of the city that is often overlooked. These structures of our culture soar to the sky and hold intimate details of our lives. They embody our energies with moments of magic. I want to capture all aspects of time – the past, the present and the hopes for the future.”

For additional information about Dowell and images of his photographs: www.johndowell.com

John Dowell will present an illustrated lecture about his work to the public at 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 19, at a Champagne Brunch at the Museum.

 


 

East/West/North: A Collaboration

November 20 - December 31, 2011

 

 

 

Presented in partnership with the
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES

EAST/WEST/NORTH: A COLLABORATION has over 40 members of the art faculties from local campuses participating. The eastside campus of the University of Evansville, the westside campus of the University of Southern Indiana, and the northside campus of IVY Tech State College join together to present their current work in this highly anticipated 25th annual collaborative exhibition.

 


 

42nd Mid-States Craft

December 11 - December 31, 2011

 

Juror, Janet McCall

 

Presented in memory of
DOROTHEA JOHNSON SCHLECHTE

The juror for the 42nd Mid-States Craft, is Janet McCall, Executive Director of the Society for Contemporary Craft in Pittsburgh.

Before serving in her current position, Janet served as Program Manager at Pittsburgh Glass Center, as Artistic Coordinator for “Aliquippa Embraces Art,” a site-specific, communitybased art exhibition in an aging steel community, and as a freelance contributor of art reviews to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. From 1975 to 1992 Janet worked for Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, in several positions including Assistant to the  President, and Director of Public Programs & Services.

A 1986 participant in the Museum Management Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, Janet received her BA from Bowling Green State University, and her MA in Art History from the University of Pittsburgh, writing her thesis on Otto Dix’s Metropolis: Gender and Identity in the Weimar Republic. She received the Distinguished Teaching Award from the History of Art & Architecture Department at the University in 1994. She is currently an adjunct faculty member there, teaching a course on Museum Studies.

The Society for Contemporary Craft (SCC) remains one of the nation’s only non-profit institutions focused on contemporary craft. SCC’s facility houses a professional exhibition gallery, space for educational programs that serve various segments of the community, and a commercial gallery for works of high craft. Since 1986, SCC has organized more than 140 thematic exhibitions featuring work by more than 1400 nationally and internationally renowned artists. Additionally, the SCC’s support of culturally diverse and underrepresented groups has resulted in many exhibitions by self-taught, Native American, Korean, and African-American artists.

Presenting contemporary art in craft media by international, national and regional artists since 1971, the Society for Contemporary Craft offers cutting edge exhibitions focused on multicultural diversity and nonmainstream art, as well as a range of classes, community outreach programs and a retail store.

McCall will visit Evansville in November to make final selections from several hundred entries in the categories of ceramics, wood, jewelry, textiles, glass, and mixed media. She will present an admission-free lecture discussing her selections on Saturday, November 19, at 7:30 p.m.

Over $8,000 in purchase and merit awards, underwritten by Evansville individuals, corporations, foundations and philanthropic organizations, will be presented on the December 10 awards evening.

 


 

All Creatures Great and Small:
The Animalier of Antoine-Louis Barye

July 1 - December 31

 

 

 

Presented in partnership with
JUDGE AND MRS. RICH D’AMOUR

 

On loan from a private Evansville collection, the exhibition ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL: THE ANIMALIER OF ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE will be exhibited in the Museum’s new second floor Alcove Gallery.

Antoine-Louis Barye was the first – and perhaps the greatest – of a group of 19th century French sculptors called “Les Animaliers.”

Animalier was originally a term derogatorily applied to sculptors who saw the subject of animals worthy in its own right of artistic consideration. Traditionally, animals were portrayed only as decorative features or in supporting roles relating to some central theme. In the 19th century, it was unthinkable for the academically trained artist to employ as a major theme the subject of animals. Barye’s miniaturesof animals were criticized as “mere paperweights” and his work was ignored until the revitalization of interest in Natural History at mid-century.

Barye had little formal education. His father was a goldsmith and Barye apprenticed as both a goldsmith and an engraver. He served in the army during the Napoleonic wars and following his discharge studied under the sculptor Basio and the painter Baron Gros. In 1823, he worked on a commission basis for the court goldsmith Fouconnier, and it was during this period that his interest in sculpture developed. His considerable knowledge of animal anatomy and behavior was the result of many hours of study at the Paris Zoo.

In 1848, Barye was named Curator at the Louvre. He was appointed Professor of Drawing for Zoology at the Paris Museum of Natural History in 1854, a post which he held until his death in 1875.

 


 

Woven Wonders: Contemporary Japanese
Baskets from the Collection of
Bradley and Jacqueline Gordon

August 28 - November 27, 2010

 

SOUND OF THE TIDE
Yako Hodo
1980, 29 x 29 x 27 inches

 

Presented in partnership with an
ANONYMOUS FOUNDATION

The idea for the Main Gallery exhibition, was brought to the Museum’s attention by former Museum Trustee Bob Goldman. He explained that his childhood friend, Evansville native Bradley Gordon, had acquired an extensive collection of contemporary Japanese basketry that the Museum might be interested in exhibiting.

For over three decades, Bradley Gordon has been interested in the arts of Japan. Now retired from the  bio-tech industry and living in California, Gordon traveled regularly to Japan through the 1980s and 1990s on business. While working in Japan, he developed a great respect and affection for its people, their culture and their varied art forms.

In 2003, after relocating to New York for a new job, he visited the Asian International Art Show and was introduced to the work of Japanese bamboo artists through an exhibition by the Tai Gallery. In the ensuing eight years, he has collected over fifty contemporary baskets made by leading Japanese artists whose artistic expression and technical mastery have created both functional and abstract constructions in bamboo.

Guided in their collecting by their good friends and mentors, the husband and wife team of Rob Coffland and Mary Hunt Kahlenberg, co-owners of the Tai Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Brad and Jacqui Gordon share an unbounded love of the art form and its dedicated and daring artists.

 


 

Figuratively Speaking 

October 2 – November 13, 2011

 

SEVEN YEARS
James Viewegh

Oil on canvas

 

This exhibit is presented in partnership with
MRS. JOHN PHILIP ROBERTSON

Since Prehistoric times, humans have been moved to draw or paint images of the people around them. As time went on, those figures began to inhabit environments that tell us much about the world in which the artist lived.

 From the Museum’s vast holdings of figurative art, a group of 19th and 20th Century American, European, and Asian paintings, drawings, prints, and sculpture have been chosen for the October 2 – November 13 Old Gallery exhibition, FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING. Although a number of the works, such as the lovely James Viewegh painting, Seven Years, were purchases from the Museum’s biennial “Mid-States” art exhibitions, others like the important 1982 lithograph, “Two Nudes with Adirondack Rocker” by the celebrated contemporary artist Philip Pearlstein, are the gifts of private donors.

 “It is important,” says Mary McNamee Bower, the Museum’s Virginia C. Schroeder Curator of Collections, “to share, from time to time, works not always on display. Such projects remind us all of the substance and variety of artworks that have been entrusted to our care.”

 


 

2011 Working Together

July 31 – September 18

 

2011 Working Together Best of Show
MY DAD'S DAD, OUR FAMILY STORYTELLER, 
oil,
RHONDA MCENROE, Owensboro, KY
 

 

This exhibit is presented in memory of
VIRGINIA B. LOWENTHAL

 

For the 18th consecutive year, regional artists will participate in a juried exhibition entitled WORKING TOGETHER. The Old Gallery exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana. Juror for this year’s competition is Becky Alley, Exhibitions and Programs Director for the Lexington Art League in Lexington, Kentucky. Alley earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in studio art from Washington University in 2000, and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Kansas in 2005. Before joining the LAL staff in January 2010, Alley was the Director of University Galleries at Murray State University for nearly four years. She has organized over 100 shows and has curated several major projects. She has also exhibited her artwork in several galleries across the United States as well as in South Korea and China, and most recently had a solo exhibition titled Count at Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania.

 


 

The Nature of Things: Photographs by Bill Vieth

May 29 - August 14, 2011

 

 

Presented in partnership with 
GAYLE AND MARK PETTINGA

 

Complementing this Summer’s Old Gallery exhibition focusing on the endangered and threatened birds of Indiana by Patricia Brentano Bramnick, THE NATURE OF THINGS: PHOTOGRAPHS BY BILL VIETH will have a special emphasis on his collection of bird photographs from around the world showing the habitat and behavior of various species.

Since retiring from a career in banking in 1996, Evansville resident Bill Vieth has taken over 10,000 wildlife and nature photographs.  He has traveled extensively throughout the United States, shooting photographs across the Rocky Mountain Range from New Mexico to Montana and throughout the State of Alaska, including the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and Denali National Park,  home to North America’s highest peak, the awe-inspiring, 20,320 foot Mount McKinley.

Vieth’s travels outside of the United States include the Canadian Northwest Territories; Tanzania and Kenya in East Africa; the Pantanal, the world’s largest freshwater wetland, located in Brazil; Costa Rica; and the Galapagos Islands.

His wildlife photographs and articles have been published in various magazines including Outdoor Indiana, Wyoming Wildlife, Colorado Summit Magazine, and Evansville Living

In addition to wildlife photography, Vieth has been active in sports photography.  He has photographed the U.S. National Men’s and Women’s soccer teams during the Olympic and World Cup Qualifying matches and Major League Professional Soccer in Denver and Dallas, as well as tournaments sponsored by the U.S. Youth Soccer Association.  The University of Evansville soccer and basketball teams have used his photographs on its website and in media guides.

 


 

We Don't Own Nature. We're Part of It!

May 1 - July 24, 2011

 

BIRD SCREEN 1, Patricia Brentano Bramnick
Cut paper, 27 x 43 inches

 

Presented in partnership with the
MARTHA AND MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION,
the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION
in memory of JOHN J. DAUS, JR.,
and MR. AND MRS. JAMES OWEN COLEMAN

 

The Artist’s Residency is sponsored by the ROBERT G. GRAVES FAMILY in honor of VIRGINIA G. AND JOHN H. SCHROEDER.

 

Patricia Brentano Bramnick has been selected as the Evansville Museum’s 2011 MARTHA AND MERRIT DEJONG MEMORIAL ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE.   In conjunction with her residency and weeklong classes, Brentano is creating a site-specific installation for the May 1 – July 24 Old Gallery exhibition.

The Evansville native’s work uniquely expresses the beauty and fragility of Indiana’s 41 endangered and threatened bird species.  An accomplished artist, Brentano is deeply committed to environmental concerns.  “I want my work to call attention to the plight of the many species of resident and migratory birds that are endangered, threatened, or of special concern due to the loss of habitat, exploitation, disease and contamination,” she said.  “The more we can bring these beautiful species into people’s awareness, the more likely we are to save them.”

Brentano cuts the shape of each bird from heavy paper.  Suspended from the Old Gallery’s ceiling, the voids in the paper – actual bird-sized silhouettes – will be filled by light and reflections.  Paired with these paper cutouts will be drawings and watercolors depicting specific birds’ nests and habitats.

Most recently, Brentano’s work was featured in the inaugural exhibition at the Hoffman Center for Conservation and Environmental Education at the Sherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary in New Jersey.  She has exhibited similar series in Connecticut and Massachusetts, receiving the Lillian Heller Curators Award at the Chesterwood Museum for her installation about the endangered birds of Massachusetts.

In 2008, Brentano received a Puffin Foundation Grant to install her “Missing Trees” exhibition in Highland Park, New Jersey.  The site had been a landfill, which the borough is transforming into an international garden in collaboration with The Edison Wetlands Association. 

Brentano teaches painting and drawing in New Jersey at Kean University and in the Institute for Women’s Leadership at Rutgers.  She began her teaching career in 1974 at the University of Evansville after receiving her Master of Fine Arts degree from Tyler School of Art at Temple University.

“My work is about observation, exploration, and a deep spiritual attachment to the natural world. I want to create skillful, innovative work that communicates environmental responsibility and visual literacy.”

Patricia Brentano Bramnick

 


 

Two Artists/Two Visions

February 27 - May 15, 2011

 

MONTRE, Aj Smith
Graphite Pencil, 2005, 46 x 36 inches

 

CANNAS GLORIA, Marjorie Williams-Smith
Silverpoint on Traditional Gesso ground mix on Fabriano paper, 2009, 46 x 36 inches

 

Presented in Memory of
DR. WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR.
in partnership with the
WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR. AND PHYLILIS R. GRIMM CHARITABLE TRUST

 

Drawings by Marjorie Williams-Smith and Aj Smith are the focus of the Evansville Museum’s 2011 celebration of Black History Month.  The Main Gallery exhibition TWO ARTISTS/TWO VISIONS showcases the work of artists who are not only professional colleagues on the art faculty of the University of Arkansas Little Rock, but have a successful 31 year marriage.  Each has an accomplished career as educator and exhibiting artist.

Associate Professor of Art Marjorie Williams-Smith earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts, Magna Cum Laude from Howard University and a Master of Fine Arts from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.  She spent five years in New York as a graphic artist before beginning her teaching career in Little Rock.

Williams-Smith’s work has been exhibited on the East Coast and throughout the mid-South region.  Her work is included in private and public collections, and, in 1999, she created artwork for the United States Mint which served as the design for the Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to the "Little Rock Nine."

Williams-Smith creates works of ethereal beauty using metalpoint, a slow, unforgiving drawing technique that flourished during the Renaissance. Her delicate renderings of roses, daffodils and carnations are drawn with silver, copper, and gold styluses on gesso-coated paper, a medium that she says “adds to the peaceful and reflective qualities I try to present in my work.”

Professor of Art Aj Smith holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in painting and printmaking from Queens College, City University of New York and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Kansas City Art Institute.  A Master Printer, Smith apprenticed with Robert Blackburn, founding Director of the Printmaking Workshop in New York City. Recognized for an extensive exhibition record, his work is represented in public and private collections throughout the United States, including the Library of Congress and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Smith’s large-scale portraits done in graphite pencil reveal the individual’s true inner self. “I feel that through my drawings I am able to show the personal side of my subjects,” he writes.  “This is most effective in the drawings of children and older adults.  The accepting face of the young child and the aged often reminds us of our own innocence and humanity.”

 


 

2011 High School Art Show

March 17 – April 17, 2011

 

CUTTY SARK, Claire Fox, Signature School
Oil
JOHN W. STREETMAN BEST OF SHOW

 

Presented in partnership with
ROBERT & MARIANNA S. WRIGHT
in memory of SHIRLEY K. WRIGHT
in cooperation with the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD

 

Now in its 48th year, the HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW continues the tradition of honoring young artists from our region.  Students currently enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 in public and private schools in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Pike, Posey, and Gibson Counties in Indiana entered works in the categories of painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, ceramics, photography and commercial design with 111 pieces accepted into the show.

Through April 17 the Old Gallery exhibition had more than 800 entries reviewed by this year’s juror, Brian Lee Whisenhunt, Director of the Swope Art Museum in Terre Haute, Indiana.

Since becoming the tenth executive director of the Swope Art Museum in June 2008, Whisenhunt has concentrated on refining the Museum’s exhibition schedule, public programs and community profile.  Whisenhunt received his Master of Arts degree in art history from the University of Oklahoma and wrote his thesis on earthworks, large-scale sculpture in the landscape from the late 1960s and early 1970s.  He has worked in museum education for more than ten years and enjoys the challenge of helping people connect with works of art.  Whisenhunt began his professional career at the Wichita Art Museum as director of education.  He then became the first manager of public programs at the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas, the largest university art museum in the United States, where he was in charge of the development of a new menu of programs for the institution when it opened a new building in 2006.

 


 

2010 - 2011 Mid-States Art

December 12, 2010 – March 6, 2011

 

 MS_Art_10_Winner.jpg

INCINERATE, Debra Clem, Louisville, Kentucky
Oil on digital image on canvas, 94 x 42 inches
$5,000 Museum Guild Purchase Award

 

Presented in partnership with an
ANONYMOUS FOUNDATION

 

The 55TH  MID-STATES ART EXHIBITION, a regional competition open to artists residing in Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri, continues through March 6 in the Old Gallery. The juror for this year’s competition was Dorian Bergen, Co-owner and Director of the ACA Galleries in New York City. 

Ms. Bergen is an advisor to the Board of Directors of the New York Open Center, one of the largest holistic education centers in the United States.  She is on the board of Faith Ringgold’s Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling and is a member of the Art Dealers Association of America and ArtTable.  ACA Galleries, founded in 1932, specializes in 19th and 20th century American & European Art and Contemporary Art.  

Ms. Bergen visited Evansville in November to make final selections from several hundred entries in the categories of painting, printmaking, drawing, sculpture and mixed media.  Purchase and merit awards, underwritten by Evansville individuals, corporations, foundations and philanthropic organizations, were presented at the December 11th awards evening to the following artists:  Debra Clem, Louisville, Kentucky; Denise Stewart-Sanabria, Knoxville, Tennessee, Amy DeLap, Vincennes, Indiana; David Hannon, Muncie, Indiana; Lowell Tolstedt, Columbus, Ohio; Grace Benedict, Lafayette, Indiana; and Kari Rajkumar, Paris, Illinois.


55 Years of Mid-States Art: Selections from the Permanent Collection

December 12, 2010 - February 13, 2011

 

Presented in Memory of
DOROTHEA JOHNSON SCHLECHTE

 

In 2010, Evansville Museum celebrates its 55th biennial Mid-States Art Exhibition.  The regional competition, open to artists living in the six Midwestern states of Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Ohio, provides recognition for emerging artists; a forum for those who wish to be shown with their peers; and the opportunity to receive a purchase or merit award. 

This retrospective Main Gallery exhibition, presented in memory of Dorothea Johnson Schlechte (1908-2010), salutes the accomplishments of the artists and jurors who participated in the experience.  A leading patron of the arts in Evansville, Mrs. Schlechte supported the Mid-States Art Exhibition for many years through the sponsorship of awards.

Selected for this retrospective are top award-winning works spanning 55 years which provide a unique overview of the development in trends and techniques of artists in the Midwest.  Located in the Museum’s permanent art galleries -- the Crescent Galleries -- are many more selections from the Mid-States Art Collection.


Michael Bergt: Bronze Sculpture from Evansville Collections

July 11 - December 31, 2010

 

Fallen_Angel_.jpg

FALLEN ANGEL, Michael Bergt
Bronze, 1998
Collection of Tay Ruthenburg 

 

Presented in partnership with
RICH and HOLLY D’AMOUR

 

Visitors to the Evansville Museum will notice a marked difference in one particular area of the second floor Garden Colonnade. As part of the first phase of the Museum’s “Reaching for the Stars” major facility renovation/expansion project, the area just outside the Main Gallery that once featured a “Vivarium” with a small fountain, live cockatiels, fish and turtles has been cleared to make way for a sleek new gallery suitable for smaller exhibitions.

Inaugurating the new space will be an exhibit of small bronze sculptures by the celebrated American artist, Michael Bergt – a longtime friend of this institution, who was featured in a 1998 one-man Main Gallery exhibition, “The Human Pageant” – is also represented in the Museum’s Contemporary American Still Life Painting Collection.

This is the first time that Bergt’s work as a sculptor has received solo attention here. All of the works featured are being loaned by Evansville collectors, including Lisa and Marty Imbler, Tay Ruthenburg, Martha Ryan, Richard and Kathy Wagner, and Kenneth Drew.

Represented in major museum, corporate and private collections throughout the United States and Europe, Bergt is widely admired for the apparent ease with which he moves from one art medium to another. Whether in his egg tempera paintings, which have gained him international acclaim, or his masterfully designed and executed sculptures and works on paper, Michael Bergt demonstrates equal technical authority and vision.

In Crossing Lines, John D. O’Hern’s insightful 2006 book about the artist, the author observes:

Michael Bergt sees with more than his eyes. He sees underlying cosmic design manifested in the human figure and in the flora and fauna around him. He intuits the psychological processes active in his models’ minds and looks for their expression in the subjects’ faces, in their appearances, and in their manners. He uses the figure to express his insights with humor and beauty.


Drawings from Judy Chicago's
"THE DINNER PARTY"

September 12 – November 28, 2010

 

Presented in Memory of 
DR. WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR.
in partnership with the 
WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR. AND PHYLLIS R. GRIMM CHARITABLE TRUST

 

From September 12 – November 28, the original drawings of The Dinner Party by Judy Chicago will be presented in the Main Gallery.  Considered an important icon of 1970s feminist art and a milestone in 20th century art, The Dinner Party by Judy Chicago comprises a massive ceremonial banquet, arranged on a triangular table with a total of 39 place settings, each commemorating an important woman from history.

On loan from the ACA Galleries in New York City, JUDY CHICAGO: SETTING THE TABLE / PREPARATORY WORKS FOR THE DINNER PARTY, includes the entire series of 39 original plate drawings that are the only complete historical record of the iconography of The Dinner Party.  Six rare Dinner Party test plates also will be on view.

An artist, feminist, humanist, educator and author whose career has spanned over four decades, Chicago is an internationally acclaimed artist who has had numerous solo exhibitions in the United States and abroad.  She is the recipient of many grants and awards, including honorary doctorates from Duke University, Lehigh University, Smith College and Russell Sage College.

Chicago’s work is in numerous collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, New Orleans Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe, the National Gallery of Art and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, among others.  The Dinner Party is now installed in the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/dinner_party/home.php


2010 East/West/North/South: A Collaboration

September 26 – November 28, 2010

 

Presented in partnership with the
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES

 

The September 26 – November 28, 2010 Old Gallery exhibition EAST/WEST/NORTH/SOUTH: A COLLABORATION highlights the work of local university art faculties.

Over 40 participants from the eastside campus of the University of Evansville, the westside campus of the University of Southern Indiana, the northside campus of IVY Tech State College, and Henderson Community College in Kentucky join together to present their current work in this highly anticipated 24th annual collaborative exhibition.


Magic & Mystery: The Art of Rob Evans

June 27 - August 29, 2010

 

  Rob Evans - Indicator

INDICATOR, Rob Evans
Watercolor and acrylic on paper, 2000, 21 x 20 inches
Collection of Mr. Martin Murray 

 

Presented in partnership with the
MARTHA AND MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION,
the WILLIAM A. CARSON FOUNDATION,
the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION in memory of JOHN J. DAUS, JR.
and MR. and MRS. JAMES OWEN COLEMAN

The Artist’s Residency is sponsored by
DR. AND MRS. SPIRO MITSOS
in cooperation with the
ROBERT G. GRAVES FAMILY
in honor of
VIRGINIA G. AND JOHN H. SCHROEDER  

 

Rob Evans has been selected as the Evansville Museum’s 2010 Martha and Merritt deJong Memorial Artist-in-Residence.  In conjunction with his residency and weeklong classes, 35 of Evans’ paintings, which are a 30-year survey, will be featured in the Main Gallery exhibition, MAGIC & MYSTERY: THE ART OF ROB EVANS, from June 27 – August 29.

Artist and independent curator Rob Evans lives and works in Wrightsville, Pennsylvania.  He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Syracuse University in 1981 and has been awarded grants from the Ford Foundation, Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation and the Pollack-Krasner Foundation.  Evans’ meticulous paintings and drawings have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions including the Evansville Museum’s 2007-2009 nationally traveling exhibition, Object Project.

Most recently, Evans’ 10 foot painting, Cicada, traveled to five museums in the state of Pennsylvania as part of the exhibition, Artists of the Commonwealth: Realism in Pennsylvania Painting 1950-2000.  His work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Corcoran Museum of Art as well as San Francisco art museums. 

Evans offers this insight into his work, “Having been raised by scientist parents, I have always had a fascination with the sciences.  For the last 20 years, my paintings have been based primarily on direct observations of the forces of nature at work: the passages of time; the cycles of life and death; growth and decay; changes of season and weather; the mysteries of life.”


Tobi Kahn: Sky & Water Meditation

April 26 – June 27, 2010

 

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OHRA, Tobi Kahn
Acrylic on Canvas over wood, 2003, Each panel 88 x 60 x 2 inches
Collection of Jane Blaffer Owen

 

Presented in partnership with the
SOL & ARLENE BRONSTEIN FOUNDATION
in cooperation with
CO-TRUSTEE INTEGRA BANK

 

TOBI KAHN: SKY AND WATER MEDITATION, an exhibition of seven monumental panels created by the noted New York artist Tobi Kahn, will be presented from April 26 – June 27 in the Old Gallery. On loan from the collection of Jane Blaffer Owen, these paintings are meant to create an atmosphere of contemplation for gatherings of celebration, remembrance and private meditation. Depictions of sky and water, the acrylic panels appear to float off the ground as an enveloping and continuous image. The series, entitled “Ohra,” was exhibited in 2003 at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, New York.

There have been more than 40 solo exhibitions of Tobi Kahn’s work since his debut at the Guggenheim Museum’s group exhibition, New Horizons in American Art, in 1985.

The Evansville Museum presented a nationally touring exhibition of his work in 2002. 


Elizabeth Zutt: A Collector’s Eye

March 28 – June 13, 2010

 

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Presented in partnership with
JOHN HARTMETZ & SHIRLEY L. WEBER
in cooperation with
JOHN & MONA WHINREY, MICHAEL & PATTY AAKHUS and ALEXANDRA LEICH

 

Selected paintings, drawings, prints, textiles and sculpture from the collection of Elizabeth Zutt (1915-2006) will be featured in the Evansville Museum’s Main Gallery exhibition, ELIZABETH ZUTT: A COLLECTOR’S EYE, from March 28 - June 13. An Evansville native, Miss Zutt bequeathed to the Museum over 100 works from a diverse art collection developed over a lifetime of travel worldwide.

Miss Zutt was a graduate of the Ward-Belmont School in Nashville, Tennessee, and the University of Wisconsin. She completed a degree in library science at Columbia University in New York City and worked for 30 years at the Evansville-Vanderburgh Public Library.

Alexandra Leich, a close friend of Miss Zutt, said in reflection that Betty Zutt “led a lifetime of spirited adventure and discovery which led her to the art of every culture; and all of it she embraced with passion.”  The Elizabeth Zutt Collection includes 20th century work by regional artists whom Miss Zutt often befriended; as well as sculpture, drawings, prints, paintings and textiles from her travels throughout Europe, Asia, Africa and South America.


47th Annual High School Art Show

March 18 – April 18, 2010

 

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LAUREN SHEA, Lauren Fuchs, Reitz Memorial High School
Oil
JOHN W. STREEMAN BEST OF SHOW

 

Presented in partnership with the
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD

 

Now in its 47th year, the HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW continues the tradition of honoring young artists from our region.  Students currently enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 in public and private schools in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Pike, Posey, and Gibson Counties in Indiana will enter work in the categories of painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, ceramics, and commercial design.

The March 18 – April 18 Old Gallery exhibition will open with an Awards Reception on Thursday, March 18 at 7:00 p.m. Volunteers from the Museum Guild and Museum Docent Association anticipate nearly 1,000 entries for review by this year’s juror, University of Evansville Professor of Art William F. Brown.  

Here is an example of the impact this exhibition continues to make in the lives of young artists in Southwestern Indiana:

Dear Evansville Museum Guild,

This was the second year that I took the challenge of entering a piece into the Annual High School Art Show. Last year, as a freshman, I did not have my piece accepted. That made this year twice as special. It was so amazing when I heard from my art teacher, Mrs. Woolsey, that I had been accepted.

 The actual night of the award reception was very rewarding, too. Just the experience of seeing my drawing in the Museum was, for lack of a better description, AWESOME! I stood close to it and listened to what people said about it. I heard only good things and it just made my night. I also received a card from a teacher from an Evansville school saying how she enjoyed seeing my drawing in the show.

I just really want to thank everyone who was involved in the High School Art Show. Without the sponsors and volunteers who make this show possible, I would not have had the chance to enter my work. I truly appreciate the Evansville Museum Guild and their volunteers who took time in their busy lives to make this possible for high school students like me. 

 It was such a great experience. I can’t wait until I get a chance to write another thank you note again next year.

 Sincerely,
Chase Bogan
Tecumseh High School (Sophomore)


Art of Africa:
Objects from the Collection of Warren Robbins

February 7 - March 14, 2010

 

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Presented in partnership with the
MARGARET A. CARGILL FOUNDATION

 

Opening the Evansville Museum’s 2010 schedule is the nationally touring exhibition ART OF AFRICA: OBJECTS FROM THE COLLECTION OF WARREN ROBBINS, from the collection of the Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communication and organized by International Art & Artists, Washington, DC.  Educational materials for the exhibition were funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.  The exhibition continues through March 14.

Warren Robbins, founder of the Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communication, was also the founder and director emeritus of the National Museum of African Art, now a branch of the Smithsonian Institution.

In Africa, art is central to life in traditional societies.  At every stage of the human life cycle, hand-crafted visual forms are used to fulfill spiritual and practical needs.  Art forms are visual representations of certain deities and ancestral spirits, which serve as intermediaries between humans and the spiritual world headed by a supreme deity.  The 65 objects in this exhibition, including sculpture, textiles, beaded clothing and jewelry, broadly represent the creativity and diversity of artistic expressions of 30 cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. 


Sculpture of the Dogon

February 7 - March 14, 2010

 

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Presented in partnership with the
WILLIAM C. H. GRIMM, JR. AND PHYLLIS R. GRIMM CHARITABLE TRUST
and the
EVANSVILLE COURIER AND PRESS

 

In 2008, nine pieces of Dogon sculpture were donated to the Evansville Museum’s permanent collection of African art by Palmina and Stephen S. Pace. The Dogon, an ethnic group located mainly in Mali, West Africa, are recognized for their carved wood sculpture.  Continuing through March 14, SCULPTURE OF THE DOGON, a special exhibition of works in the Museum’s own holdings complements the temporary exhibition Art of Africa: Objects from the Collection of Warren Robbins.


2009 - 2010 Mid-States Craft

December 6, 2009 – January 31, 2010

 

Presented in partnership with
TAMARACK PETROLEUM COMPANY 
in honor of LOUIS W. RITZ

 

The juror for this six-state competition is Jane Sauer, Director of the Jane Sauer Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Known for her outstanding reputation among art collectors, museum curators, art critics, and artists, Jane has 34 years of experience as both an innovative studio artist and gallery director. She has served in leadership roles as a volunteer with the National Advisory Board to the Washington University School of Art, St. Louis, Missouri; Friends of Contemporary Art, New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; and the American Craft Council, serving as Chair from 1997-2000. 

Over $8,000 in purchase and merit awards, underwritten by Evansville individuals, corporations, foundations, and philanthropic organizations, were presented at the December 5 awards evening.


American Visions: The Folk Art Collection of Lisa & Marty Imbler

September 20 – November 29, 2009

 

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(detail) DEVIL AND HIS WIFE, Carl McKenzie
Wood, 19 x 5 x 4 inches, 1985
From the Imbler Folk Art Collection

 

A selection of 125 works from the American folk art collection of Marty and Lisa Imbler will be included in the Evansville Museum’s September 20 – November 29 Main Gallery exhibition AMERICAN VISIONS: THE FOLK ART COLLECTION OF LISA AND MARTY IMBLER.  Acquired over the past twenty years with the expert guidance of Mike Smith, Director of the At Home Gallery in Greensboro, North Carolina, the Imbler Collection has an emphasis on art of the American South and includes paintings, drawings, sculpture, ceramics, and mixed media work by some of the country’s best known self taught artists — James Harold Jennings, Howard Finster, Bill Traylor, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Leroy Almon, Benjamin Franklin Perkins, Minnie Evans, Mary Tillman Smith, and Thornton Dial.

American folk art of the 20th century is defined by its freedom of spirit. Not bound by the rules of an art academy or constraints of society, the folk artist feels instinctively the fundamentals of art — rhythm, design, balance, and proportion.

The general term “folk art” encompasses a wide range of paintings, drawings, and sculpture made by individuals who have not studied art formally but express through their subject matter their life experiences, personal surroundings, and inner visions.  Grounded in craft traditions, many artists develop new art forms.  Some are motivated to create from their passionate religious beliefs or sense of patriotism. Other folk artists, who are isolated physically or emotionally from the cultural mainstream, produce highly personal work known as “Outsider Art.” 

With the organization of major public exhibitions and the publication of scholarly texts in recent years, American 20th century folk art is now recognized as an important part of the art history of our country.


2009 East/West/North/South

August 30 - October 18, 2009

 

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Presented in partnership with the
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES

 

The August 30 – October 18 Old Gallery exhibition EAST/WEST/NORTH: A COLLABORATION is presented in partnership with the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM CONTEMPORARIES.

Nearly forty members of the art faculties from the eastside campus of the University of Evansville, the westside campus of the University of Southern Indiana, and the northside campus of IVY Tech State College join together to present their current work in this highly anticipated 23rd annual collaborative exhibition.


The Luster of Silver: Contemporary Metalpoint Drawings

June 28 - September 13, 2009

 

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ELIZA, Koo Schadler
Silverpoint and egg tempra on blue toned true gesso panel, 6 x 8 inches, 2006
Collection of the Evansville Museum

 

Presented in memory of
DR. WILLIAM C.H. GRIMM, JR.
in partnership with
THE WILLIAM C.H. GRIMM, JR. AND PHYLLIS R. GRIMM CHARITABLE TRUST

 

From June 28 - September 13, the work of 27 artists from 15 states and Canada will be presented in the Main Gallery exhibition THE LUSTER OF SILVER: CONTEMPORARY METALPOINT DRAWINGS.  Co-curated by participating artists Koo Schadler and Jeannine Cook, the project explores a subtle and lesser known but incredibly beautiful drawing technique. The medium referred to as silverpoint is the technique of drawing with a metal stylus. Although it has been used to inscribe surfaces since Classical times, silverpoint — or as it is more generally called “metalpoint” — was expressly employed in drawing from the late 14th century up to the early 17th century and was particularly favored in the Renaissance period in Italy, the Netherlands, and Germany. Master artists Raphael, Durer, Holbein, Rembrandt, and Rubens all used silverpoint in drawing studies.

Koo Schadler, co-curator writes, “The ubiquitous pencil (a piece of graphite placed inside a hollow tube of wood) wasn’t an option for a Renaissance draftsman — it hadn’t been invented yet.  Instead most early artists learned to draw using a nib of metal stuck in a stylus. Copper, gold, lead, and other metals were used, but a silver point was the most popular.” 

Through the concerted efforts of a growing number of contemporary artists, this medium is today enjoying its own Renaissance, as realist artists are finding new ways to explore, refine and make it their own.

The Evansville Museum, as an internationally recognized champion of contemporary realism, is proud to partner with this group of artists who are producing realist work in another, less traditional media.

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Several participating artists were able to attend the Opening Reception on June 27.  
(L to R) George Sorrels, Marjorie Williams-Smith, Koo Schadler, Thomas Wayne Rice, Jeannine Cook, Curtis Bartone, Pavel Ouporov and Suzanne Scherer with their son.


2009 Working Together

July 12 – August 23, 2009

 

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SEPERATE SHADES, Chris LaMarche, Evansville, Indiana
Pastel
Best of Show Award

 

Presented in memory of
VIRGINIA B. LOWENTHAL

 

For the 16th consecutive year, regional artists have participated in a juried exhibition entitled WORKING TOGETHER..  Presented in memory of VIRGINIA B. LOWENTHAL, the July 12 – August 23 Old Gallery exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana. Juror for this year's competition is John P. Begley, Adjunct Associate Professor of Art and Director of the University of Louisville's Allen R. Hite Art Institute. 

The first to hold the position of gallery director at the University of Louisville, Begley moved to the Hite Art Institute in 2001 after serving as Director of the Louisville Visual Arts Association for 18 years. 

In addition to directing the galleries at the University of Louisville and coordinating the Curatorial Studies concentration in its Masters program, Begley is an accomplished artist who maintains an individual studio practice combining a variety of his interests and training, including drawing and printmaking, book arts, installation, and intermedia combinations that examine the nature of seeing, making, and thinking about the world of art. 


Lasting Legacies: Recent Gifts of the Work of Carolyn Plochmann and Stephen S. Pace

April 26 – July 5, 2009

 

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CARETAKER, Carolyn Plochmann
Acrylic on canvas, 2006,
Gift of the artist

 

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WINDOW GAZING WITH GENGHIS (Portrait of Pam Pace), Stephen S. Pace
Oil on Canvas, 1993, 42 x 52 inches
Gift of Dr. Stephen S. Pace and Palmina F. Pace

 

Paintings and drawings by two artists with longstanding associations with the Evansville Museum are featured in the April 26 – July 5 Old Gallery exhibition LASTING LEGACIES: RECENT GIFTS OF THE WORK OF CAROLYN PLOCHMANN AND STEPHEN S. PACE.

In 2008, the preeminent American painter Dr. Stephen S. Pace and his wife, Palmina F. Pace, presented 20 paintings and drawings to the Museum's permanent collection. In addition to this generous gift of work by Dr. Pace, the couple donated two works by artist Milton Avery (1893-1965) and their collection of African sculpture.

The recipient of many awards and recognitions, Stephen Pace was honored with the Evansville Museum's Expatriate Artist Award for his distinguished career in the visual arts. The award was presented in conjunction with a major retrospective of his work in our Main Gallery in 1992.

Beginning in the 1950s, Stephen Pace became a prominent member of the New York group of abstract expressionist painters. His work, hailed by the New York Times for its "highly sophisticated use of color and joyous compositions", is in public collections across the country, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art. For six decades, Pace's vibrant paintings, washed with vivid colors and bold brush strokes, have brightened the world.

The exhibition also will include 23 paintings and drawings by Carolyn Plochmann that span from the 1940s to 2008. Generously donated by the artist over the past three years, these gifts bring the Museum's present holdings of her work to an impressive total of 34. Plochmann, a prominent American painter who resides in Southern Illinois, has been a friend of our Museum for 50 years. In 1990, the Evansville Museum organized a national tour of her work and published A Charmed Vision: The Art of Carolyn Plochmann, an illustrated book available for purchase through The Museum Shop.

Plochmann's work is collected nationally and her exhibition record includes 40 solo exhibitions and over 50 group shows. In the course of a six-decade career, she has received numerous awards for her work. Former Metropolitan Museum Director Thomas Hoving praised her for creating work that is "compellingly poetic" and "enhanced with fabulous harmonies of lines and delicate nuances of color."


Laurin D. Notheisen 2009 Martha and Merritt DeJong Memorial Artist-in-Residence

April 5 – June 21, 2009

 

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THE BIKE PATH, Laurin D. Notheisen
Graphite pencil, 23 x 36 inches, 2006
Collection of Ellen and Ed Kirtley

 

Exhibition presented in partnership with the
MARTHA & MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION,
the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION
in memory of JOHN J. DAUS, JR.,
and MR. & MRS. JAMES OWEN COLEMAN

The Artist’s Residency is presented in partnership with the
CHARLES & ALEXA JAMISON FUND OF THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC.
in memory of
ALEXA JAMISON & PEGRAM HARRISON

 

Laurin D. Notheisen has been selected as the Evansville Museum’s 2009 Martha and Merritt deJong Memorial Artist-in-Residence. In conjunction with her residency and week-long classes, 40 of Notheisen’s works will be featured in the Main Gallery from April 5 – June 21. The exhibition is presented in partnership with the MARTHA & MERRITT DEJONG FOUNDATION, the DAUS FAMILY FOUNDATION in memory of John J. Daus, Jr., and Mr. & Mrs. James Owen Coleman. The artist’s visit is sponsored by CHARLES & ALEXA JAMISON FUND OF THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. in memory of ALEXA JAMISON & PEGRAM HARRISON.

Born in 1951, Notheisen grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and attended children’s classes on Saturdays at the Art Institute. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting and her Master of Fine Arts degree in lithography from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. In 1975, she was hired by Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green where she continues to teach basic design and printmaking.

Notheisen’s participation in the Evansville Museum’s 1973 Mid-States Art Exhibition was the beginning of an extensive succession of local, regional and national juried competitions in which she has participated, as well as solo, group and invitational exhibitions.

In addition to the Evansville Museum’s collection, Notheisen’s work may be found in corporate and public collections including Brown-Forman,Louisville Gas and Electric, Mammoth Cave National Park, Arkansas State University and Austin Peay University. Her work was featured in the KET video production Looking at Painting, Part 1 – Realism, by Robert Tharsing.•


46th Annual High School Art Show

March 19 – April 19, 2009

 

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HOPEFUL, Lauren Longest, North High School
Colored Pencil
JOHN W. STREETMAN BEST OF SHOW
Lauren Longest with Guild President Dr. Karen Braselton. Photo courtesy of Matt Rowe.

 

Presented in partnership with the
EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD

 

Now in its 46th year, the HIGH SCHOOL ART SHOW continues the tradition of honoring young artists from our region. Students currently enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 in public and private schools in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Pike, Posey, and Gibson Counties in Indiana will enter work in the categories of painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, ceramics, and commercial design.

Presented in partnership with the EVANSVILLE MUSEUM GUILD, the March 19 – April 19 Old Gallery exhibition opened with an Awards Reception on Thursday, March 19. Volunteers from the Museum Guild and Museum Docent Association anticipate nearly 1,000 entries for this year's juror, Erika Myers-Bromwell, to review.

Erika Myers-Bromwell, a native of Maryland, was named Director of the New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art in August of 2008 after serving as Assistant Director for six years. As Director, Myers-Bromwell curates a broad range of contemporary exhibitions at the Gallery and implements collaborative programming with non-profit entities in New Harmony and the Kenneth P. McCutchan Art Center / Palmina F. and Stephen S. Pace Galleries at the University of Southern Indiana.

Myers-Bromwell received her undergraduate degree at St. Mary's College of Maryland and earned her graduate degree from the University of Southern Indiana.